call sign

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call sign

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

call sign

or

call signal

n
(Broadcasting) a group of letters and numbers identifying a radio transmitting station, esp an amateur radio station. Compare call letters
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

call′ let`ters


n.pl.
letters of the alphabet or letters and numbers used esp. for identifying a radio or television station.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

call sign

Any combination of characters or pronounceable words, which identifies a communication facility, a command, an authority, an activity, or a unit; used primarily for establishing and maintaining communications. Also called CS. See also collective call sign; indefinite call sign; international call sign; net call sign; tactical call sign; visual call sign; voice call sign.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
Translations

call sign

nsegnale m di chiamata
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardinal Seven Sierra Delta, caution, similar sounding callsigns on frequency, watch out for Bonanza Seven Zero Delta."
Third, the controller was confusing aircraft callsigns. This combination of factors immediately reduced aircrew situational awareness and made us very uncomfortable.
Bush's father called a halt to Operation Desert Storm, two US Air Force F-111 bombers, callsigns Cardinal 1 and 2, dropped two 4,700-pound penetration bombs on an underground bunker near the Al Taji air base, northwest of Baghdad, which senior Iraqi commanders were known to use.
For ATC applications, the landing sequence and wind speed are displayed, while other uses -- such as taking data from surface movement radar, thermal imagers, or other sensors -- might enable the ATC tower controller of the future to see tagged aircraft with callsigns and status, whatever the weather, 24 hours a day.
Information obtained during the course of the operation included Japanese W/T procedures, secret callsigns and technical details of W/T stations.
Intelligence estimates and order of battle information could be used to set target activity search priorities, along with providing possible times of operation, frequencies and callsigns of high-priority targets and other essential elements of information (EEI).