caloric

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ca·lor·ic

 (kə-lôr′ĭk, -lŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to heat: the caloric effect of sunlight.
2. Of or relating to calories: the caloric content of foods.
n.
A hypothetically indestructible, uncreatable, highly elastic, self-repellent, all-pervading fluid formerly thought responsible for the production, possession, and transfer of heat.

[French calorique, from Latin calor, heat; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ca·lor′i·cal·ly adv.

caloric

(kəˈlɒrɪk; ˈkælərɪk)
adj
(General Physics) of or concerned with heat or calories
n
(General Physics) obsolete a hypothetical elastic fluid formerly postulated as the embodiment of heat
caloricity n

ca•lor•ic

(kəˈlɔr ɪk, -ˈlɒr-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to calories.
2. of or pertaining to heat.
3. high in calories: a caloric meal.
n.
4. heat.
5. a hypothetical fluid whose presence in matter was once thought to determine its thermal state.
[1785–95; < French calorique < Latin calor heat + French -ique -ic]
ca•lor′i•cal•ly, adv.
cal•o•ric•i•ty (ˌkæl əˈrɪs ɪ ti) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.caloric - relating to or associated with heat; "thermal movements of molecules"; "thermal capacity"; "thermic energy"; "the caloric effect of sunlight"
2.caloric - of or relating to calories in food; "comparison of foods on a caloric basis"; "the caloric content of foods"
Translations

caloric

[ˌkəˈlɒrɪk]
A. ADJcalórico, térmico
B. CPD caloric energy Nenergía f calórica or térmica

caloric

ca·lor·ic

n. calórico-a, rel. al calor o las calorías;
___ intakeingestión ___;
___ methodmétodo ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomson was initially skeptical because Joule's ideas were so unlike conventional thinking, but he noted that Joule's theory helped explain some shortcomings of traditional caloric theory and over the next four years he convinced himself that Joule's reasoning was correct.
When it was considered that water could be made to boil by putting the pot on hot rocks, this concept was replaced by the caloric theory of heat as a conserved fluid that flowed from hot to cold bodies.
The final narrative chapter outlines Sadi Carnot's description of the working of a perfect heat engine, and William Thomson's use of that heat cycle to develop three theoretical definitions of temperature, the first (1847) grounded in Caloric theory, the second (1851) in the mechanical theory of heat, and the last (1881) in thermodynamics.