Calvinism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Cal·vin·ism

 (kăl′vĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
The religious doctrines of John Calvin, emphasizing the omnipotence of God and the salvation of the elect by God's grace alone.

Cal′vin·ist adj. & n.
Cal′vin·is′tic adj.
Cal′vin·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

Calvinism

(ˈkælvɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Theology) the theological system of John Calvin and his followers, characterized by emphasis on the doctrines of predestination, the irresistibility of grace, and justification by faith
ˈCalvinist n, adj
ˌCalvinˈistic, ˌCalvinˈistical adj

Cal•vin•ism

(ˈkæl vəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrines and teachings of John Calvin or his followers, emphasizing predestination, supreme authority of the Scriptures, and irresistibility of grace.
2. adherence to these doctrines.
[1560–70]
Cal′vin•ist, n., adj.
Cal`vin•is′tic, adj.
Cal•vin•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Calvinism

1. the doctrines of John Calvin or his followers, especially emphasis upon predestination and limited atonement, the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures and the irresistibility of grace.
2. adherence to these doctrines. Also called Genevanism. Cf. Arminianism. — Calvinist, n., adj. — Calvinistic, Calvinistical, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Calvinism - the theological system of John Calvin and his followers emphasizing omnipotence of God and salvation by grace alone
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Translations
kalvinismi
kalvinizam
kalwinizm

Calvinism

[ˈkælvɪnɪzəm] Ncalvinismo m

Calvinism

nCalvinismus m
References in classic literature ?
We have yet had no genius in America, with tyrannous eye, which knew the value of our incomparable materials, and saw, in the barbarism and materialism of the times, another carnival of the same gods whose picture he so much admires in Homer; then in the Middle Age; then in Calvinism. Banks and tariffs, the newspaper and caucus, Methodism and Unitarianism, are flat and dull to dull people, but rest on the same foundations of wonder as the town of Troy and the temple of Delphi, and are as swiftly passing away.
But Winterbourne had an old attachment for the little metropolis of Calvinism; he had been put to school there as a boy, and he had afterward gone to college there--circumstances which had led to his forming a great many youthful friendships.
Synopsis: In "40 Questions About Calvinism", Shawn Wright (who is the Professor of Church History at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and a Pastor at the Clifton Baptist Church in Louisville, Kentucky) tackles many issues about the theological system known as Calvinism.
Although this school was founded in the Presbyterian tradition, this institution did not teach only Calvinism or Westminster Catechism.
Those tensions surface in Leise's reading of Robinson's Gilead, which is a very good account of how Robinson revisits Calvinism to highlight its diverse strands of thinking.
These thinkers represent the body of inter-related traditions that can be considered Reformed in the historical sense, she says, a set of traditions that includes Anglican and Wesleyan perspectives as well as churches associated with Lutheranism and Calvinism. Her topics include a Roman Stoic ethic of assent, the primacy of faith in a Protestant virtue ethic, and emotions in the virtuous life.
Individuals scoring high on both Calvinist theological beliefs and complementarian gender role beliefs scored significantly higher on hierarchical relationship expectations and existential defensiveness, and preferred a Christian psychology view of integration and a male headship perspective of leadership, compared to those scoring low on Calvinism and complementarianism.
Although Cameron's discussion and description of black communities in Massachusetts in the Revolutionary period finds solid ground in the second half of the book, the first detracts from the second tenant of his argument that these black activists articulated Calvinism into their doctrines and ideologies, thus connecting them to seventeenth-century Puritanism.
Green's complex personality shatters certain myths associated with strict, dour Calvinism: he claims spiritual leadership but gets censured by his congregation for failing to live up to his teachings; he is a property and luxury seeker while decrying those who put money and worldly affairs before God; he is extremely introverted but he also lashes out in anger against his church when refused a better salary; he can be a slave holder but also an abolitionist.
Sanford, Blueprint for Theocracy, traces the vocal religious right to its roots, arguing its strong historical ties to Calvinism and a level of ideological devotion which liberals would be imprudent to underestimate.
Enchanted Calvinism; labor migration, afflicting spirits, and Christian therapy in the Presbyterian Church of Ghana.
In response, Brewster rightly warns that contemporary researchers should not dismiss the errors associated with high Calvinism, nor the influence of Fullerism in helping Baptists move beyond it.