Camus

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Ca·mus

 (kä-mo͞o′, -mü′), Albert 1913-1960.
Algerian-born French writer and philosopher whose works, such as the novels The Stranger (1942) and The Plague (1947), concern the absurdity of the human condition. He won the 1957 Nobel Prize for literature.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Camus

(French kamy)
n
(Biography) Albert (albɛr). 1913–60, French novelist, dramatist, and essayist, noted for his pessimistic portrayal of man's condition of isolation in an absurd world: author of the novels L'Étranger (1942) and La Peste (1947), the plays Le Malentendu (1945) and Caligula (1946), and the essays Le Mythe de Sisyphe (1942) and L'Homme révolté (1951): Nobel prize for literature 1957
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ca•mus

(kaˈmü; Eng. kæˈmu)

n.
Albert, 1913–60, French novelist, playwright, and essayist: Nobel prize 1957.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Camus - French writer who portrayed the human condition as isolated in an absurd world (1913-1960)
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