Camestres

Camestres

a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the second figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one universal negative premise and a universal negative conclusion.
See also: Logic
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In particular, it distinguishes sentential from argumental rules: a distinction essential in understanding the difference between (1) deduction--as in the Corcoran-Smiley interpretation of syllogistic--and (2) reduction--as in the manipulation of arguments that gave rise to the mnemonics Bocardo, Camestres, and so on.
One prominent syllogistic process attributed to Aristotle is the "reduction" of imperfect syllogisms to perfect syllogisms that gave rise to the medieval mnemonics, Baroco, Camestres, and so on.
All the incomplete deductions of the second figure are privative, whether they are universal (Cesare and Camestres) or particular (Festino and Baroco).
The next universal deduction of the second figure is Camestres, which inverts the two premises of Cesare for a same conclusion: (39)
The potential inferential necessity of Camestres is based on the following proof.
Therefore, Camestres is an incomplete deduction, that is, potentially complete, "for the first figure has again been produced." (40) The change in the formal ordering of the terms (from 2.2 to 1.2) means that, in the incomplete Camestres, the term N (which is a subject in the premise and a predicate in the conclusion) is reduced, in the complete Celarent, to the term N (which is a predicate in both the premise and the conclusion).
123, 31-35, que alude al silogismo afirmativo de la primera figura (Barbara), (Camestres, 85a3)--.
I 13, Aristoteles construye silogismos de la primera (78a28-b13) y la segunda figura (Camestres) (78M3-34: B = "animal", A = "respirar", C = "muro": B x A, B x C [??] A x C).
Esta DN6 puede ser inferida por medio de un silogismo tipo Camestres: