Camestres

Camestres

a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the second figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one universal negative premise and a universal negative conclusion.
See also: Logic
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All the incomplete deductions of the second figure are privative, whether they are universal (Cesare and Camestres) or particular (Festino and Baroco).
The next universal deduction of the second figure is Camestres, which inverts the two premises of Cesare for a same conclusion: (39)
The potential inferential necessity of Camestres is based on the following proof.
Therefore, Camestres is an incomplete deduction, that is, potentially complete, "for the first figure has again been produced." (40) The change in the formal ordering of the terms (from 2.2 to 1.2) means that, in the incomplete Camestres, the term N (which is a subject in the premise and a predicate in the conclusion) is reduced, in the complete Celarent, to the term N (which is a predicate in both the premise and the conclusion).