Campbell-Bannerman


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Camp·bell-Ban·ner·man

 (kăm′bəl-băn′ər-mən, kăm′əl-), Sir Henry 1836-1908.
British politician who was the Liberal Party leader during the Boer War (1899-1902) and later served as prime minister (1905-1908).

Campbell-Bannerman

(ˈkæmbəlˈbænəmən)
n
(Biography) Sir Henry. 1836–1908, British statesman and leader of the Liberal Party (1899–1908); prime minister (1905–08), who granted self-government to the Transvaal and the Orange River Colony
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References in periodicals archive ?
A new biography on former Prime Minister and Stirling MP Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman was launched last week.
Apparently, I briefly woke post-surgery in the recovery room ranting about Henry Campbell-Bannerman, the only former prime minister to die in 10 Downing Street, as it A-happens.
A Asquith B Gladstone C Campbell-Bannerman D Lloyd-George 6.
Then we'll get a taste for it, and we'll extend the definition of treason to include "remoaners", as the Tory MEP David Campbell-Bannerman wants.
But the main speech was given by the Liberal leader and later prime minister, Henry Campbell-Bannerman. "We stand today at the parting of the ways," he told the crowd.
Despite an unpromising start to British welfare reform under Liberal Prime Minister Campbell-Bannerman, elected in 1906, says Cooper, much of the Poor Law system was rendered redundant by successive Liberal administrations by 1914.
The building, complete with unique cage life, was home of the city's Education Board for decades and, before that, the residence of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, Britain's Liberal Prime Minister between 1905 and 1908.
The report submitted in 1907 to British Prime Minister Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman emphasized that the Arab countries and the Muslim-Arab people living in the Ottoman Empire presented a very real threat to European countries, and it recommended the following actions:
Commonwealth Secretary-General, Kamalesh Sharma and High Commissioners from Commonwealth Countries; Lord Naseby, Damian Collins M.P., David Campbell-Bannerman M.E.P., David Morris, M.P., joined other Members of Parliament, Commonwealth Institutions, and cricket enthusiasts to felicitate the team.
In 1874, the house and estate was bought by Sir James Campbell, Lord Provost of Glasgow and father of PM Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman.
Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman achieved which political office in 1905?
Campbell-Bannerman conveyed a similar message to his US audience, saying the EU was "not a true friend to the US" but "potentially a great rival, if not a great foe".