Campfire Girl


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Campfire Girl - a girl who is a member of Campfire GirlsCampfire Girl - a girl who is a member of Campfire Girls; for girls age 7-18
female child, little girl, girl - a youthful female person; "the baby was a girl"; "the girls were just learning to ride a tricycle"
References in periodicals archive ?
She was a Campfire Girl leader, organized thank-you luncheons for teachers, maintained the most interesting backyard complete with ice-skating rink, yearly art shows, the largest sandbox around, and a three-story treehouse with a death-defying zipline.
(61) As titles such as Campfire Girls on a Long Hike (1918), Campfire Girls' Trip Up the River (1918), and A Campfire Girl in Summer Camp (1914) suggest, the novels are about adventures taking place in the wilderness.
Forest Service and my father's firm in 1944, had inculcated the belief in every schoolchild, every Campfire Girl, every Boy Scout, Girl Scout, Brownie, and Cub in the United States that forest fires are bad, and that they are the fault, usually, of a "careless smoker," of those who do not heed the gruff warning to "drown your campfires," or even perhaps those who are enemies of democracy.
She served as a Cub Scouts' Den Mother, a PTO member, a Campfire Girls Leader and sat on the Board of Directors for the Worcester chapter.
Among the groups that have supported the Santa Claus Girls through the years are the Advertising Club, Boy Scouts, Campfire Girls, YWCA, Grand Rapids Junior Women's Club, and Coffee Dunkers of America.
Additionally, I remember how Demers stepped up to rescue the Campfire Girls' Wilani Camp from bankruptcy in 1999.
General Holm is the author of Women in the Military: An Unfinished Revolution [Novato, Calif.: Presidio Press, 1982] She served as a trustee for the Air Force Historical Foundation, a member of the board of Campfire Girls, Inc., and the Pentagon Federal Credit Union.
Girl Scouts (or Campfire Girls, or a similar such group)
Former Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Campfire Girls all remember the ecstasy of scary tales accompanied by the fun of making s'mores over the campfire.
My mother has searched diligently for Campfire Girls books to purchase or exchange.
Her mother, who now lives in Alaska, was a homemaker and Campfire Girls leader.
At the turn of the twentieth century, when industrialization began to wedge its way between white Americans and the land, playing Indian helped people to reclaim aboriginal "roots." Deloria points out that the newly formed Boy Scouts and the Campfire Girls were appealing to urban, upper-class Americans who feared that the harshness of modernity was eroding their children's connection to the natural world.