campylobacter


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campylobacter

(ˌkæmpɪləʊˈbæktə)
n
(Microbiology) a rod-shaped bacterium that causes infections in cattle and man. Unpasteurized milk infected with campylobacter is a common cause of gastroenteritis
[from Greek kampulos bent + bacter(ium)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Edirne'de ishal etkenleri arasinda Campylobacter turlerinin yerinin ve antimikrobiklere duyarliliklarinin arastirilmasi.
The Food Standards Agency found almost one in 10 Lidl chickens were highly contaminated with campylobacter, the main cause of food poisoning in Britain.
Although relatively little is known about the virulence of Campylobacter spp., these microorganisms possess different virulence factors (VFs) related to motility, adhesion, invasion, toxin-activity, immune evasion, and iron-uptake, among others [2].
Campylobacter is a key zoonotic pathogen which causes food-borne enteritis with C.
Many of the existing studies on the association pathogen-sperm are not conclusive because, the detection of this union is complex and in some in some cases uncertain (Casadevall & Pirofski, 2000) as in the case of Campylobacter fetus (Bielanski et al, 1994).
Digestive disorders and diarrhea caused by the bacterial Campylobacter is among the common illnesses primarily in developing countries, and 5 to 15 percent of diarrhea in these countries are instigated by the bacteria, and the prevalence of the bacteria as a cause of diarrhea in our country has been reported to be from 2 to 10 % (11), and even the primary cause of death in developed countries, especially among children under 5 in the United States, was attributed to such bacteriain that two million cases of bacterial infection are reported each year (18).
Because washing raw chicken before cooking can increase the risk of food poisoning from campylobacter and salmonella bacteria.
Supermarkets have made "significant reductions" in campylobacter contamination since the FSA launched its retail chicken survey in 2014, the regulator's policy director Rebecca Sudworth said last week.
The small store supply chain still needs to do much more to better control levels of the dangerous campylobacter bacteria present on fresh whole chicken sold through small convenience stores and butchers, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) has warned.
In March 2017, the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS) and the Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department were notified of an apparent cluster of Campylobacter jejuni infections in city A and initiated an investigation.