campylobacter

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campylobacter

(ˌkæmpɪləʊˈbæktə)
n
(Microbiology) a rod-shaped bacterium that causes infections in cattle and man. Unpasteurized milk infected with campylobacter is a common cause of gastroenteritis
[from Greek kampulos bent + bacter(ium)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Since the poultry and poultry meat are the most important sources of Campylobacter infections, many authors have studied the prevalence of Campylobacter on poultry in different countries (ZANETTI et al., 1996; DOMINGUEZ et al., 2002; PEZZOTTI et al., 2003; YANG et al., 2003; WHYTE et al., 2004; HUSSAIN et al., 2007; BARDON et al., 2011; ZENDEHBAD et al., 2015; ZHONG et al., 2016).
In the United States, most of the reported Campylobacter infections are caused by Campylobacter jejuni (C.
Outbreak isolates were resistant by antibiotic susceptibility testing to all antibiotics commonly used to treat Campylobacter infections, including macrolides and quinolones.
There are about 280,000 campylobacter infections annually and the Food Standards Agency report that 54 per cent of chickens tested positive for the bacteria last year, with 6.5 per cent having the highest possible level of contamination.
A good example is the use of fluoroquinolone in poultry and the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infections among humans.
Although symptomatic infections were marginally associated with reduced linear growth over nine-month periods, the severity of the episodes was correlated with greater deficits in both weight gain and linear growth, demonstrating the need for early control of Campylobacter infections [29].
Clinical course of Campylobacter infections in children.
Edward Kunonga, the borough's director of public health, said: "In Middlesbrough, campylobacter infections account for more than half of all food-borne diseases reported to the council."
The rate of campylobacter infections was 13 percent higher in 2013 compared to 2006-2008, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Campylobacter infections in children under the age of two years are especially frequent, sometimes resulting in death.
Whether or not current regulations are as toothless as suggested by the EWG, increased compliance with standards outlined by regulatory bodies and a better understanding of how antibiotic resistance increased instances of foodbome illness will be vital in reversing the upward trend of campylobacter infections.

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