CanLit


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Related to CanLit: Canlii

CanLit

(ˌkænˈlɪt)
n acronym for
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Canadian Literature
References in periodicals archive ?
The specific trajectories of CanLit bespeak a continuing anxiety over intent and purpose, its ends always threatening to dissolve.
If you type CanLit or Canadian literature into Google, you get our home page [Canadian Literature journal].
The Prince of Asturias Award given to Margaret Atwood in 2008 and the Nobel Prize awarded to Alice Munro in 2013 made Canlit more visible in Spain, and this is what Made in Canada, Read in Spain: Essays on the Translation and Circulation of English-Canadian Literature (2013) focuses on: the different factors involved in the transnational transfer of Canadian literature in English into Spain up to current times.
Brydon (2007) notices that students and critics of Can Lit have been reiteratively analyzing the nation, and it is time to shift the critical attention onto the state to wonder how institutions encourage or constrain literary work, or, for example, if CanLit itself has become an institutionalized body with the mechanisms of book publishing, academic reviewing and teaching contributing to the solidification of a canon, and this, in turn, to the boosting of the nation-state paraphernalia.
There are so many other positive images that could have been used to complement the CanLit feature and represent the authors and books you recommended in a way that didn't detract from, or make light of, their excellent quality.
As for the rest of the CanLit authors, the whole depressing miserable lot of them can wallow in their gloom without my taking part in the festival of misery.
The last word is crucial as it entrusts CanLit with the survival of the nation.
Given is a must-read for anyone looking to unsettle staid definitions of CanLit.
Herb Wyile, a professor at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, who is known in CanLit academic circles as a theorist of regionalism, also puts the word "reshaping" in the subtitle of his book, Anne of Tim Hortons: Globalization and the Reshaping of Atlantic-Canadian Literature.
We can see in these literary references some examples of the theme of "survival" which Margaret Atwood highlighted in her study of Canlit authors.
She and her fellow luminaries forged a literary culture that could be called the CanLit Generation, a period in which English-language writing in this country became something larger than an accumulation of narratives and poems: it became an institution and a marketing category and, most importantLy, a nuanced and genuinely entertaining way of considering our place in the world and in history.
Especially in these times when we are reaping the harvest of Thatcherism and Reaganomics, Rifkind's book--written as it certainly was befbre the latest crash--provides an excellent view of how that earlier crash of 1929 and its aftermath shaped the politics and aesthetics of women who did at least as much to shape our English-language literature as did the later and still-reigning queens of CanLit such as Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro.