Kanak

(redirected from Canaque)

Kanak

(kəˈnæk)
n
a native or inhabitant of New Caledonia who seeks independence from France
[C20: from Hawaiian: man]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Une cle de la societe canaque, les reseaux d'identite partagee.
Noumea: Office culturel scientifique et technique canaque & ORSTOM.
O missionario Maurice Leenhardt, ao deixar a Nova Caledonia, pergunta a um de seus informantes canaque se eles lhes teriam trazido o espirito.
He liked to hunt birds, fish and Canaques she said, and this had disturbed me because the word Canaque (or Kanak) means native in New Caledonia.
We drove through the town, past the Roman Catholic cathedral, Gothic and glimmering against the tropic green of the hill behind, past flower-garlanded groups of islanders gathered to giggle and slap each other under a tulip tree, past the Canaque women playing cricket in their colourful dresses and then out into the countryside.
What factors contributed to Michel's willingness not only to sympathize with the Kanaks, but to embrace in them an alternative identity, as when she asserts in her memoirs that in New Caledonia she was considered "plus canaque que les Canaques" (300)?
She started a school for neighbouring Kanak tribes and took notes on their language and culture for her 1885 publication, Legendes et chants de gestes canaques. Other exiled Communards accused her of "savagery" when she tried to create a Kanak-inspired theater complete with an orchestra based on quarter tones, but their annoyance turned to indignation when she expressed support for the 1878 Kanak revolt against the French.
While Kanak are seldom named as individuals and seldom appear outside their reserves (an isolation consistent with colonial prognoses about their inability to assimilate or survive as a race), the 'canaque stockman' (Vermast 1902: 73ff) is the principal exception.
Leopold Barada was permitted to lead a group of mounted settler volunteers on the grounds that, having 'lived among the natives of the region for twenty years', he 'is familiar with their habits and customs and knows, perhaps better than a canaque, all the paths and passes of this mountainous district.' (16) On the other hand, Barada refused to recruit his own Kanak stockmen for fear of reprisals, including the withdrawal of labour.