Cancer cells


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cells once believed to be peculiar to cancers, but now know to be epithelial cells differing in no respect from those found elsewhere in the body, and distinguished only by peculiarity of location and grouping.

See also: Cancer

References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- A new research has explained how studying the diversity of cancer cells could help turn off mutations in cancer cells and strip their adaptability to drugs.
Scientists at the Ovarian Cancer Institute Laboratory at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found in initial tests that a regulatory RNA called miR-429 may be successful in inducing metastatic or spreading cancer cells to convert back to a less metastatic, non-invasive form.
A single tumor-suppressing gene is a key to understanding--and perhaps killing--dormant ovarian cancer cells that hide out after initial treatment, only to reawaken years later, report researchers at the University of Texas M.
Traditional cancer therapies are nonspecific, designed to kill the cancer cells -- and everything else in its path.
Erlotinib (Tarceva) attacks cells by blocking a receptor protein that's abundant on the surface of some cancer cells (SN: 8/27/05, p.
Fractions (1 min) were collected, and triplicate aliquots were assayed for mitogenic activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.
The third phase includes clinical trials in which RECAF(tm) will be used as a way to specifically deliver therapeutic agents to destroy the cancer cells with minimal damage to normal tissues.
RESEARCHERS at America's St Louis University are destroying tumours with genetically engineered viruses that infect cancer cells whilst leaving healthy cells unharmed.
The disease-fighting immune system is programmed to destroy abnormal cells, like cancer cells.
You see the same incidence of microscopic clusters of cancer cells throughout the world," says Warren Heston of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.
Cancer cells have multiple abnormalities, including DNA damage, but they are able to survive and proliferate because key checkpoints and apoptotic pathways are disabled as the cancer develops.
Researchers at Salk Institute used a small pipette to extract and analyze the RNA of individual breast cancer cells to track a cancer cell line's evolution.