candida

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can·di·da

 (kăn′dĭ-də)
n.
Any of various fungi of the genus Candida that are found especially on the skin and in the mucous membranes of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina and that may become pathogenic, such as C. albicans, the causative agent of thrush.

[Latin, feminine of candidus, white; see candid.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

candida

(ˈkændɪdə)
n
(Microbiology) any yeastlike parasitic fungus of the genus Candida, esp C. albicans, which causes thrush (candidiasis)
[New Latin, feminine of candidus white]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.candida - any of the yeastlike imperfect fungi of the genus Candida
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
genus Candida - a genus of yeastlike imperfect fungi; sometimes included in genus Monilia of the family Moniliaceae
Candida albicans, Monilia albicans - a parasitic fungus that can infect the mouth or the skin or the intestines or the vagina
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

candida

[ˈkændɪdə] N (Med) → afta f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

candida

n (Med) → Candidose f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
If we put a more broad look at geographical distribution of the pathogens, Candida glabrata isolates are more common in North America (23.5%), Candida albicans isolates are more common in Asia Pacific region (56.9%), with Candida parapsilosis (25.6%) and Candida tropicalis (17.0%) being more prominent in Latin American region15.
(1), (5) Infections with Candida glabrata and other Candida species are increasing with frequency.
Candida glabrata and Candida albicans co-infection of an in vitro oral epithelium.
The INFINITI[R] Resolve QUAD Assay individually identifies Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus spp., Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Candida glabrata in samples onboard the automated molecular diagnostics platform, the INFINITI System.
For women with such repeat infection, vaginal cultures should be obtained to confirm Candida and to search for treatment-resistant species, such as Candida glabrata. (Many C glabrata organisms are resistant to standard fluconazole treatment.)
Initially, we demonstrated the LOD and time for detection for isoPCR by targeting the Candida glabrata pathogen.
Although Candida albicans is the predominant species isolated from vaginal samples (85-95%), Candida non-albicans (CNA) species have been reported with increasing frequency, mainly Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei (BAUTERS et al., 2002; LOPESCONSOLARO et al., 2004).
The Maladia Infection Services in Tunisia reported the first case of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis due to Candida glabrata, which occurred in a 64-year-old diabetic woman.
(1992) Structural study of a cell wall mannan-protein complex of the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata IFO 0622 strain.
Although it was patented back in 1957 as the world's first antifungal, antibiotic nystatin upstaged newer antifungal agents when used to treat vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by Candida glabrata in sequential.
Although it was patented back in .1957 as the world's first antifungal, antibiotic nystatin upstaged newer antifungal agents when used to treat vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by Candida glabrata in sequential, prospective clinical trials.