Cantabrigian

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Can·ta·brig·i·an

 (kăn′tə-brĭj′ē-ən)
adj.
1. Of or relating to Cambridge, England, or Cambridge, Massachusetts.
2. Of or relating to Cambridge University.
n.
1. A native or resident of Cambridge, England, or Cambridge, Massachusetts.
2. A student or graduate of Cambridge University.

[From Medieval Latin Cantabrigia, Cambridge, England.]

Cantabrigian

(ˌkæntəˈbrɪdʒɪən)
adj
1. (Education) of, relating to, or characteristic of Cambridge or Cambridge University, or of Cambridge, Massachusetts, or Harvard University
2. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Cambridge or Cambridge University, or of Cambridge, Massachusetts, or Harvard University
n
3. (Education) a member or graduate of Cambridge University or Harvard University
4. (Peoples) an inhabitant or native of Cambridge
[C17: from Medieval Latin Cantabrigia]

Can•ta•brig•i•an

(ˌkæn təˈbrɪdʒ i ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Cambridge, England, or Cambridge University.
2. of or pertaining to Cambridge, Mass., or Harvard University.
n.
3. a native or resident of Cambridge.
4. a student at or graduate of Cambridge University or Harvard University.
[1610–20; < Medieval Latin Cantabrigi(a) Cambridge + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cantabrigian - a resident of Cambridge
Cambridge - a city in eastern England on the River Cam; site of Cambridge University
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
References in periodicals archive ?
A short stay in this burial ground will also reveal the last resting places of Nobel prize winner Sir John Cockcroft, two of Charles Darwin's sons and the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, as well as many other distinguished past Cantabrigians.
Cantabrigians have learnt to recognize the arthouse as a lifestyle accessory too.
Tucsonans William Hartmann and Donald Davis saw the Moon-forming event as the logical extrapolation of the solar system's violent cratering history, whereas Cantabrigians Alastair Cameron and William Ward saw it as a way to explain the Earth-Moon system's copious angular momentum.