Canterbury Pilgrims


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Canterbury Pilgrims

pl n
1. (Historical Terms) the pilgrims whose stories are told in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
2. (Historical Terms) NZ the early settlers in Christchurch, Canterbury region
References in periodicals archive ?
The hospital of Blessed Mary of Ospringe, commonly known as "Maison Dieu' was founded in 1230AD to care for the sick and elderly and shelter Canterbury pilgrims. The building probably also accommodated secular chantry priests, and incorporates remnants of the original 13th century stone undercroft beneath an early 16th century jettled, timber-framed upper floor; ABOVE: Maison Dieu, 1941.
The Canterbury Pilgrims gained an airing at Malvern Winter Gardens in 1963, the year of George Dyson's 80th birthday.
(1) In the present note I wish to draw attention to a leitmotif in the General Prologue that has hitherto been overlooked: the girdles, belts, and cords that bedeck some of the Canterbury pilgrims and are conspicuously absent from the costumes of others.
It begins, "All serious pilgrims go on foot to their holy destinations--Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims stand for so many others." Unfortunately, those pilgrims sat on horseback.
As detailed by Read, Blake's genius must have been sparked by closely reading The Examiner as it promoted Louis Schiavonetti's engraving of Stothard's painting The Canterbury Pilgrims and Cromek's Chalcographic Society throughout 1810.
Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims will not be far from the reader's thoughts as he or she begins Jerusalem in Medieval Narrative.
We contend, therefore, that the concepts of relationship management discussed by communications scholars, specifically those who teach public relations, can be fruitfully used to analyze some of Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims. Such concepts can be used, for instance, to explain why the verbal performances of the Wife of Bath and the Pardoner, so similar in the self-revelatory nature of their prologues and tales, have such different effects on their imagined pilgrim audience and, indeed, on modern readers as well.
1 Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims; 2 A tablespoon; 3 Jumbo; 4 A tuft of hair projecting from the forehead; 5 Oberon.
ANSWERS: 1 Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims; 2 A tablespoon; 3 Jumbo; 4 A tuft of hair projecting from the forehead; 5 Oberon; 6 A daffodil; 7 Padraig Harrington; 8 Spinal injuries; 9 Stealth; 10 Charles Clarke.
Chaucer himself draws attention to the importance of 'array' (A 41) for the understanding of the social status, moral condition, and spiritual aspiration of the Canterbury pilgrims. Laura Hodges has already done us a great service in her account of the dress and equipment of the secular pilgrims in Chaucer and Costume (Cambridge: Brewer, 2000), and now she puts us further in her debt in this complementary study of the religious pilgrims.
He is likely to have encountered the Jewish physicians, merchants, booksellers, illuminators, scribes, musicians, actors, moneylenders, or scholars who lived and worked at some of the courts and cities he visited, and above all in Spain ..." A veritable God's plenty of Jews they were, compensation perhaps for the fact that plainly none of the 30 Canterbury pilgrims could possibly be Jews.

Full browser ?