canzona

(redirected from Canzonas)

canzona

(kænˈzəʊnə)
n
(Classical Music) a type of 16th- or 17th-century contrapuntal music, usually for keyboard, lute, or instrumental ensemble
[C19: from Italian, from Latin cantiō song, from canere to sing]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The keyboard pieces range from toccatas, those in contrapuntal genres such as canzonas and ricercares, to dances, some with divisions.
In fact, the only evident organization within the collection is the one also encountered in two other collections that Frescobaldi assembled during those same years: the instrumental ensemble canzonas of 1628, and the Arie musicali (secular vocal ensemble works) of 1630.
In his works, he also deepened the difference between the vocal and instrumental styles, as is evident in his organ ricercars, canzonas, toccatas and dance compositions.
Think brass ensemble, though, and Gabrieli canzonas or similar works written for similar groups spring to mind.
Bach, works by Michael Praetorius and William Brade, and early canzonas and sonatas for violin and sackbut by Dario Castello and Giulio Belli.
Fifty works have been chosen, representing such forms as chant, organum, masses, motets, chanson, canzonas, lute pieces, ricercari and keyboard works from an anonymous early-seventeenth-century canzona to a fugue from Bach's Die Kunst der Fuge.
Interplay between strings and wind in magnificent canzonas by composers such as the Gabrielis was rendered with delicacy and rhythmic poise.
In the second volume of his Il transilvano (Venice, 1609), Girolamo Diruta directs his organ students towards the sedulous study of ricercares, canzonas, Masses, motets and madrigals with the hope that they might thereby attain the highest level of expertise in playing the organ.
The first is HYPERION'S exciting new release, the Canzonas and Sonatas from Sacrae Symphonioe 1597 by Giovanni Gabrieli (CDA 66908).
Since Books 4 and 7 (and also Book 5) contain sonatas, sinfonias and a variety of dances, whereas Book 6 contains only sonatas and canzonas, it seems reasonable to regard the binary and variation sonatas as intended primarily for performance in a secular context appropriate for dances.
Both collections are large and startlingly heterogeneous both in genre and in scoring: opus 8 contains sonatas (including the well-known variation sonata on La monica), capriccios, sinfonias, ritornellos, canzonas, dance movements, and a tremendous "Passemezzo concertato in dieci parti"; opus 22 has sonatas (one of which is based ingeniously on the traditional tune "Fuggi, dolente core," also known as the Barabano), dance movements, and a four-part "Passacaglio" (in a rondeau form anticipating the French type familiar from Francois Couperin's Passecaille in B minor from the 8e ordre of the Second livre de pieces de clavecin [Paris: auteur, 1716-17]) that has become almost a "lollipop" on the early music scene.
In addition to their contributions to the choral works, His Majesties Sagbutts and Cornetts introduced mellow offerings of Canzonas by Hassler and Gabrieli.