canzonetta

(redirected from Canzonettas)

canzonetta

(ˌkænzəˈnɛtə) or

canzonet

n
(Classical Music) a short cheerful or lively song, typically of the 16th to 18th centuries
[C16: Italian canzonetta, diminutive of canzone]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in classic literature ?
"Monsieur Servin has not taken his wife into his confidence as to this mystery," thought Ginevra, who, after replying to the young wife's speech with a gentle smile of incredulity, began to hum a Corsican "canzonetta" to cover the noise that was made by the prisoner.
Among the treasures from this period is Joseph Haydn's VI Original Canzonettas (1794), with Haydn's autograph on the cover (fig.
Gennaro 1598), a collection of Sale's Italian canzonettas for three voices was printed, revealing his yielding to the then fashionable taste and affection for Italy (Nigrin's name is Italianised, stated as "Giorgio Negrino") and dedicated to Albert Furstenberg.
For instance, Olson selects two of the English Canzonettas by Joseph Haydn as examples of early German song.
All of the texts are in the form of free madrigals; several are modified versions of strophic canzonettas. Most are anonymous, but five are by Giovanni Battista Guarini, two by Livio Celiano (Angelo Grillo), and one by Ercole Cavalletto.
Background information about poets such as Aloys Jeitelles (Beethoven's An die ferne Geliebte) and Anne Hunter (who provided texts for many of Haydn's canzonettas) was readily available.
Some time later, four collections of her music, including ariettas for voice and figured bass, canzonettas for several voices (now lost), and arias with instrumental accompaniment, appeared in print, all clustered around 1780.
Like all good teachers, Ingegneri groomed his star pupil with extreme care: Monteverdi worked his way up from three-voice motets (1582) and canzonettas (1584) and four-voice spiritual madrigals (1583).
In the opening chapter, Massimo Privitera refers to the Farnese-Pio wedding festivities held at Sassuolo in 1587, to Vecchi's writings on the event and to his extensive library and portrait collection in order to establish various biographical, social, cultural and repertorial contexts for the canzonettas. A brief consideration of the preface to Vecchi's Le veglie di Siena raises the question of 'variety within unity', an issue which is as central to the argument of this book as it evidently was to Vecchi's approach to composition.
by Vecclii, and arranges them chronologically, from the publication of Vecchi's first two books of four-voice canzonettas in 1578/79 and 1580 respectively, to the appearance of L'Amfiparnaso in 1597.