Seven against Thebes

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Seven against Thebes

pl n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the seven members of an expedition undertaken to regain for Polynices, a son of Oedipus, his share in the throne of Thebes from his usurping brother Eteocles. The seven are usually listed as Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraus, Capaneus, Hippomedon, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus. The campaign failed and the warring brothers killed each other in single combat before the Theban walls. See also Adrastus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Rather, come and let us all go to help them, or else let loose your weapon, the great and formidable Titan-killer with which you killed Capaneus, that doughty man, and great Enceladus and the wild tribes of Giants; ay, let it loose, for so the most valiant will be slain.'
`The sons of the Achaeans who held Argos and walled Tiryns, and Hermione and Asine which lie along a deep bay, and Troezen, and Eiones, and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the island of Aegina, and Mases, -- these followed strong-voiced Diomedes, son of Tydeus, who had the spirit of his father the son of Oeneus, and Sthenelus, dear son of famous Capaneus. And with these two there went a third leader, Eurypylus, a godlike man, son of the lord Mecisteus, sprung of Talaus; but strong-voiced Diomedes was their chief leader.
The men of Argos, again, and those who held the walls of Tiryns, with Hermione, and Asine upon the gulf; Troezene, Eionae, and the vineyard lands of Epidaurus; the Achaean youths, moreover, who came from Aegina and Mases; these were led by Diomed of the loud battle-cry, and Sthenelus son of famed Capaneus. With them in command was Euryalus, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but Diomed was chief over them all.
A delirious Evadne, widow of Capaneus, jumps into the funeral pyre to burn along with her husband.
I have already stated that the Siren's speech and appearance have strong connections to the sins of pride and fraud--to the proud blasphemy of Capaneus in Inferno 14, for example, and to the deceit of Geryon and false counsel of Ulysses in Inferno 17 and 26.
At the mountains of madness we move from a concept of blasphemy as grounded in human agency (the blasphemy of Capaneus in the underworld) to a blasphemy of the unhuman ("more and more amphibious").
We know from Dante's Inferno that the afterlife is, in one sense, an intensified version of the world that individuals chose for themselves while they were alive: in circle 7, ring 3, the violent against God, nature, and art, Capaneus the blasphemer utters the memorable saying, "'What I was alive, I am in death'"(14.
The Virtus who inspires Menoeceus' act [of self-sacrifice] and receives his lifeless body (10.780-81) belongs to a new order of values, and bears no relation to the uncontainable virtus, the sheer martial force, of Capaneus or Tydeus.' Catherine Sanok (1998) and Angelo M Mangini (2009) note the way in which female figures in Statius are portrayed particularly sympathetically.
Since Francesca de' Lazzari's name clearly recalls that of Lazarus, Boccaccio's decision to cast her as a scion of the Lazzari family may be due, at least in part, to her Lazarus-like resurrection from an erotic "tomb." Scannadio's name--"scannare" (to slit a throat) + "dio" (God)--suggests that he is a man bent on slitting God's throat, a fourteenth-century scion of Otus, Capaneus, Lucifer and the various other would-be slayers of God.
Eteocles' view that the tongue eventually proves an unerring accuser of men's foul thoughts in reference to Capaneus' irreverent threats in Seven against Thebes ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 438-39).