Cape primrose


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Cape primrose

n.
Any of various chiefly African plants of the genus Streptocarpus, widely cultivated as houseplants for their attractive foliage and clusters of showy colorful flowers. Also called streptocarpus.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cape primrose

n
(Plants) See streptocarpus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cape primrose - any of various African plants of the genus Streptocarpus widely cultivated especially as houseplants for their showy blue or purple flowers
genus Streptocarpus - large genus of usually stemless African or Asian herbs: Cape primrose
streptocarpus - any of various plants of the genus Streptocarpus having leaves in a basal rosette and flowers like primroses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Streptocarpus is an ugly name for a beautiful house plant and the common name cape primrose is much more appealing.
No plant will grow permanently in the same pot, although there are some, such as Saintpaulia (African Violets) and Styreptocarpus (Cape Primrose) that flower best in almost pot-bound conditions because the root ball is small in relation to the top.
PLUMBAGO or Cape Primrose produces beautiful pale blue flowers throughout the summer.
3 CAPE PRIMROSE or Streptocarpus is a real delight with its prettily marked and veined flowers.
Cyclamen, poinsettias, Christmas cactus, bowls of bulbs and the new all-year-flowering varieties of streptocarpus (Cape primrose) like Crystal Ice need watering more often.
The Cape primrose, or streptocarpus, is among the fastest-improving house and conservatory plants, with new, longer-flowering varieties in a wider range of colours being introduced every year.