Capetian


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Ca·pe·tian

 (kə-pē′shən)
adj.
Of or relating to the French dynasty founded by Hugh Capet.
n.
A member of this dynasty.

Capetian

(kəˈpiːʃən)
n
(Historical Terms) a member of the dynasty founded by Hugh Capet, which ruled France from 987–1328 ad
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to the Capetian kings or their rule

Ca•pe•tian

(kəˈpi ʃən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the French dynasty that ruled France A.D. 987–1328.
n.
2. a member of this dynasty.
[1830–40; < French capétien, after Hugh Capet]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Capetian - a member of the Capetian dynastyCapetian - a member of the Capetian dynasty  
Capetian dynasty - a Frankish dynasty founded by Hugh Capet that ruled from 987 to 1328
crowned head, monarch, sovereign - a nation's ruler or head of state usually by hereditary right
Adj.1.Capetian - of or relating to the French dynasty founded by Hugh Capet
References in periodicals archive ?
In France, by contrast, the crown invariably passed from deceased kings to their eldest paternal relatives and the reigning Capetian dynasty never faced extinction.
For a useful bibliographical summary on Bertrada, see Kathleen Nolan, 'The Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne', in Capetian Women, ed.
Sobre su actividad como patrona, SCHOWALTER, Kathleen, Capetian Women and their books: Art, Idelogy, and Dinastic continuity in Medieval France, Tesis Doctoral, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 2005, y los dos capitulos, SHADIS, Miriam, "Blanche of Castille and Facinger's Medieval Queenship" (pp.
Monarchies, including the Capetian dynasty in France, were overthrown, and other reforms that allegedly broke with Europe's feudal, aristocratic past were instituted.
The gothic style emerged at the time of the consolidation of the kingdom of France during the reign of the Capetian dynasty (987-1316).
explores how as the French region of Languedoc came to be absorbed into the medieval Capetian kingdom in the wake of the Albigensian Crusade municipal, royal, and ecclesiastical officials struggled for jurisdiction over the population of the city of Toulouse, as well as how urban populations themselves engaged in these contestations through protests, revolts, and public engagement with the legal system, thereby playing a key role in the formation of the political and judicial structures of the 13th and 14th centuries.
lt;<THE ELDEST DAUGHTER OF THE KING>>: KNOWLEDGE, POWER AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CAPETIAN MONARCHY AND THE UNIVERSITY OF PARIS IN THE THIRTEENTH AND FOURTEENTH CENTURIES
50) The Capetian kings seem to have been constantly involved in marriage scandals, including adultery, bigamy, and incest since the beginning of the eleventh century, when King Robert the Pious married three women, and repudiated two wives, claiming that the marriages had been tainted by incest.
Turner succeeds in placing Eleanor at the center of a century's worth of political and administrative activity dominated by the towering figures of Henry II, Richard I, and John and their perpetual confrontation with the Capetian kings Louis VII (Eleanor's first husband) and Philip II, he interprets her activity, especially before 1176 (when she was imprisoned by Henry II for inciting the rebellion of their sons), as unproductive, impulsive, and even nefarious, even though most of these interpretations are speculations based on very thin evidence.
Rather than confront the all-too-fresh ignominies of military surrender, German occupation, and French collaboration, the self-professed royalist appeals time and again to the France of the Capetian kings and their inaugural triumph over the German emperor Otto IV.
The episodes' successive heroes and kings, both good and evil, lead Stahl to the central argument that the lineage of the biblical kings and the establishment of the kingdom of Israel present a paradigm or even a prefiguration of the Capetian monarchy as defenders of the Church (207).