capillary action

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capillary action

n.
The interaction between contacting surfaces of a liquid and a solid that distorts the liquid surface from a planar shape and causes the liquid to rise or fall in a narrow tube.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

capillary action

The movement of a liquid along the surface of a solid caused by the greater attraction of the liquid's molecules to the surface of the solid than to each other. The liquid's molecules adhere to the solid surface and also to each other, so that each molecule pulls the next one along. Water moves through the roots of trees or into the pores of a sponge or towel by capillary action.
Did You Know? The paper towel industry owes its existence to capillary action. Towels easily draw up water, much as a drop of blood to be taken for a test will defy gravity and travel up a small tube. In both cases, the force of gravity is still in effect, but it is being overwhelmed by the stickiness of liquids. The molecules of liquid stick to the sides of a narrow tube or the tiny channels in a towel, and other molecules stick to the first molecules, so the liquid crawls upwards. Some people think that this capillary action is responsible for moving water from the roots to the highest leaves of a tree, but it can only push water up so high. The remaining trip is powered by transpiration pull. As water evaporates from leaves, it sets up a suction that turns the entire tree into a straw through which the water on the bottom is pulled up.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capillary action - a phenomenon associated with surface tension and resulting in the elevation or depression of liquids in capillariescapillary action - a phenomenon associated with surface tension and resulting in the elevation or depression of liquids in capillaries
surface tension - a phenomenon at the surface of a liquid caused by intermolecular forces
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investment in a new liquid extrusion capillary flow porometer, a Porolux 100FW, will help NIRI's clients through the quick quantification of through-pore diameters present in a nonwoven structure.
Careful selection of materials, together with a controlled capillary flow have been crucial to the success of this project.
[5], who first revealed the mechanism of coffee-ring pattern formation via colloidal droplet evaporation, noted the important role of capillary flow on mass transport caused by uneven evaporation.
Washburn, "Dynamics of capillary flow," Physical Review, vol.
The blood flow within a retinal capillary is approximately 6.4 microns in diameter; therefore the lateral resolution of an OCTA system must meet or exceed this minimum specification in order to accurately record capillary flow and blood vessel patterns.
Broadbent and Hammersley [12] were the earliest ones to model capillary flow in fractures using the standard percolation (SP) theory.
Artifactual hypoglycaemia in patients with systemic sclerosis is thought to be due to low capillary blood glucose levels due to reduced capillary flow, leading to deceleration of glucose transit and subsequent increased uptake of glucose by local tissues [5].
These techniques visualize blood flow at the level of individual capillaries in available thin mucosa (often sublingual) and help to assess capillary flow and density in humans.
A free capillary flow is essential to obtain correct hemoglobin results.
Hence, viscous dissipation resulting in non-isothermal melt temperatures in the Hagen-Pouiselle capillary flow can lead to significant differences between the transient data and the "steady" data.

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