seven deadly sins

(redirected from Capital Vices)

seven deadly sins

pl n
(Theology) a fuller name for the deadly sins
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
sieben Todsünden
siete pecados capitales
seitsemän kuolemansyntiä
sept péchés capitaux
hét főbűn
dauðasyndirnar sjö
sette peccati capitali
七つの大罪
sete pecados capitais
sju dödssynderna
References in periodicals archive ?
Feels Fest 2019 featuring Erabella, Speaking with Ghosts, When We Was Kids, Guardrail, Capital Vices, Synovial, Havens and Glory Days: 4:30 p.m.
Clarke presents short sayings of the Church Fathers on the seven deadly sins, also known as the seven capital vices or the eight evil thoughts.
In the 14th century the church felt it necessary to identify the capital vices or cardinal sins.
Next, relying on the work of Thomas Aquinas, the paper considers the roles love and power play in holy and unholy fear and extends this analysis of the passion of fear by means of an analogy to the capital vices. The essay concludes that this extension illuminates the moral significance of John Paul II's call not to be afraid and shows how this theme of his pontificate is inextricably linked to another great theme of his teaching, that of love as a gift of oneself.
Most of you have perhaps known or heard about the seven deadly sins also known as the "cardinal sins" or the "capital vices".
In Dante's Purgatory, the exploration of affective states is evidenced in relation to the seven capital vices. Tambling argues that while Dante adheres to defined notions of emotional states in some instances in the poem, in others he captures a shifting, metamorphic quality, one that is not readily definable.
Although there is no definitive list of mortal sins, many believers accept the broad seven deadly sins or capital vices laid down in the sixth century by Pope Gregory the Great and popularized in the Middle Ages by Dante in The Inferno: lust, gluttony, avarice, sloth, anger, envy and pride.
Thomas's 16 questions on evil dealt with a wide variety of topics: sin, original sin, venial sin, capital vices, avarice, envy, anger, gluttony, vainglory, lust, spiritual apathy, devils, and human choice.
Thus, writers after Gregory could draw on three traditions to attack avarice: "the Deadly Sins; the octad of Capital Vices; and the Gregorian heptad, in effect a synthesis of both" (106).
Like the medieval list of capital vices, this focus on deadly isms has its own advantages.
In her penultimate chapter, "Capital Vices," Taylor argues that just as each of the virtues are interconnected, so too are the deadly vices.

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