poll tax

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Related to Capitation tax: Medicare Tax

poll tax

n.
A fixed tax levied on all persons in a certain area, especially as a condition of voting in elections.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

poll tax

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a tax levied per head of adult population
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an informal name for (the former) community charge
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

poll′ tax`


n.
a capitation tax, sometimes levied as a prerequisite for voting.
[1685–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poll tax - a tax of a fixed amount per person and payable as a requirement for the right to vote
capitation - a tax levied on the basis of a fixed amount per person
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
fejadó

poll tax

nKopfsteuer f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
I gave the example of the Western Region (comprising even more than what is now known as the South West Zone), where, without oil money, and using capitation tax and revenues from agriculture and mining, the government-funded free education for over 800,000 pupils in 1955, built several roads, farm settlements, industrial estates, the first TV station in Africa, and the tallest building in Nigeria, while still giving up fifty percent of its earnings from mining and minerals for allocation to the Federal Government and other regions.
Ironically, the Supreme Court in the Pollock case did not rule that taxing income earned through labor was essentially a tax on people, a capitation tax. Nonetheless, the court struck down the entire 1894 income tax in the Pollock case, necessitating a constitutional amendment in order to enact a federal income tax.
(15) It was thus possible to reassess each farmer's landholdings as listed on the capitation tax register and determine the commune's land distribution.