capuchin

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cap·u·chin

 (kăp′yə-chĭn, -shĭn, kə-pyo͞o′-)
n.
1. Capuchin A monk belonging to the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, an independent order of Franciscans founded in Italy in 1525-1528 and dedicated to preaching and missionary work.
2. A hooded cloak worn by women.
3. Any of several monkeys of the genus Cebus of Central and South America, having a prehensile tail and often a black or brown cap of hair on top of the head. Also called sapajou.

[Obsolete French, from Italian cappuccino, pointed cowl, Capuchin, from cappuccio, hood; see capuche.]

capuchin

(ˈkæpjʊtʃɪn; -ʃɪn)
n
1. (Animals) any agile intelligent New World monkey of the genus Cebus, inhabiting forests in South America, typically having a cowl of thick hair on the top of the head
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a woman's hooded cloak
3. (Breeds) (sometimes capital) a rare variety of domestic fancy pigeon
[C16: from French, from Italian cappuccino, from cappuccio hood; see capuche]

Capuchin

(ˈkæpjʊtʃɪn; ˈkæpjʊʃɪn)
n
(Roman Catholic Church)
a. a friar belonging to a strict and autonomous branch of the Franciscan order founded in 1525
b. (as modifier): a Capuchin friar.
[C16: from French; see capuche]

cap•u•chin

(ˈkæp yʊ tʃɪn, -ʃɪn)

n.
1. any New World monkey of the genus Cebus, having a prehensile tail and tufts of hair on the head.
2. a hooded cloak for women.
3. (cap.) a friar belonging to the Franciscan order that observes vows of poverty and austerity.
[1590–1600; < Middle French < Italian cappuccino=cappucc(io) capuche + -ino -ine1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capuchin - a hooded cloak for women
cloak - a loose outer garment
2.capuchin - monkey of Central America and South America having thick hair on the head that resembles a monk's cowlcapuchin - monkey of Central America and South America having thick hair on the head that resembles a monk's cowl
New World monkey, platyrrhine, platyrrhinian - hairy-faced arboreal monkeys having widely separated nostrils and long usually prehensile tails
Cebus, genus Cebus - type genus of the Cebidae
Translations

capuchin

[ˈkæpjʊʃɪn] N
1. (= cowl) → capucho m
2. (Zool) → mono m capuchino
3. Capuchin (Rel) → capuchino m

capuchin

n
(= hooded cloak)Kapuzencape nt
(Zool) → Kapuziner(affe) m
(Eccl) CapuchinKapuziner(mönch) m
References in classic literature ?
More than once some individual has appeared to me with such negligence of labor and such commanding contemplation, a haughty beneficiary begging in the name of God, as made good to the nineteenth century Simeon the Stylite, the Thebais, and the first Capuchins.
From the sanguinary sports of the Holy Inquisition; the slaughter of the Coliseum; and the dismal tombs of the Catacombs, I naturally pass to the picturesque horrors of the Capuchin Convent.
We--up stairs--Monks of the Capuchin order--my brethren.
The young lady had on her hat and capuchin, and the aunt acquainted Mr Western, "that she intended to take her niece with her to her own lodgings; for, indeed, brother," says she, "these rooms are not fit to receive a Christian soul in.
He relates that he met at Brussels Rochefort, the AME DAMNEE of the cardinal disguised as a Capuchin, and that this cursed Rochefort, thanks to his disguise, had tricked Monsieur de Laigues, like a ninny as he is.
He went to a ball at the hotel of the Bavarian envoy, the Count de Springbock- Hohenlaufen, with his head shaved and dressed as a Capuchin friar.
The governor of the Bastile was Monsieur du Tremblay, the brother of the famous Capuchin, Joseph, that fearful favorite of Richelieu's, who went by the name of the Gray Cardinal.
For all seven yellow-breasted capuchins born there since 2011 have been males.
The Detroit Capuchins, whose work is funded primarily by donations, also operate the Solanus Casey Center, which attracts 250,000 visitors a year.
Contract notice: Renovation of the chapel of the capuchins.
Wild bearded capuchins in Brazil use handheld stones to whack rocks poking out of cliffs and outcrops, although researchers don't know why.
However, in this case, a clear distinction is to be made between the stone flakes produced by the capuchins and the tools used by early Homo sapiens and their close relatives.