caravanserai

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Related to Caravansarai: caravanserai

car·a·van·sa·ry

 (kăr′ə-văn′sə-rē) also car·a·van·se·rai (-rī′)
n. pl. car·a·van·sa·ries also car·a·van·se·rais
1. An inn built around a large court for accommodating caravans along trade routes in central and western Asia.
2. A large inn or hostelry. In both senses also called serai.

[French caravanserai, from Persian kārvānsarāy : kārvān, caravan + sarāy, camp, palace; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

caravanserai

,

caravansarai

or

caravansary

n, pl -rais or -ries
(in some Eastern countries esp formerly) a large inn enclosing a courtyard providing accommodation for caravans
[C16: from Persian kārwānsarāī caravan inn]

caravanserai

- A type of inn in Eastern countries where caravans are put up.
See also related terms for inn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caravanserai - an inn in some eastern countries with a large courtyard that provides accommodation for caravanscaravanserai - an inn in some eastern countries with a large courtyard that provides accommodation for caravans
auberge, hostel, hostelry, inn, lodge - a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
Translations

caravanserai

caravansary [ˌkærəˈvænsəraɪ, ˌkærəˈvænsərɪ] Ncaravasar m

caravanserai

nKarawanserei f

caravanserai

[ˌkærəˈvænsəˌraɪ] ncaravanserraglio
References in periodicals archive ?
I was the initiator and co-director of Caravansarai, an art and production space in Istanbul with an active artist in residency program.
Composed of an introduction, four additional chapters, a conclusion, and a generous collection of photos and plans, the real meat is in chapter five, simply titled "Gazetteer." The reason for the brevity of the title becomes significant when one notices that chapters two to four have the very straightforwardly descriptive titles of "Terminology: From Khan to Caravansarai," "The Patronage of Mamluk Rural Inns," and "The Architecture of Rural Khans in Bilad al-Sham during the Mamluk Period." All three chapters, which are very meticulously researched, depend on published primary and secondary sources.
Subhash Parihar looks at the wall paintings in a 17th-century caravansarai built by the Mughals.