carbide

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Related to Carbides: carbonates

car·bide

 (kär′bīd′)
n.
1. A binary compound consisting of carbon and a more electropositive element, especially calcium.
2. Any of various hard durable materials made of compacted binary compounds of carbon, especially those with silicon, boron, or a heavy metal, used as abrasives and in tools that cut metal.

carbide

(ˈkɑːbaɪd)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a binary compound of carbon with a more electropositive element. See also acetylide
2. (Elements & Compounds) See calcium carbide

car•bide

(ˈkɑr baɪd, -bɪd)

n.
1. a compound of carbon with a more electropositive element or group.
3. a very hard mixture of sintered carbides of various heavy metals, esp. tungsten carbide, used for cutting edges and dies.
[1860–65; carb (on) + -ide]

car·bide

(kär′bīd′)
A chemical compound consisting of carbon and a metal, such as calcium or tungsten. Many carbides are very hard and are used to make cutting tools and abrasives.

Carbide

Calcium carbide. When water drips on calcium carbide, acetylene gas is formed. The acetylene can then be used as fuel for lights.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbide - a binary compound of carbon with a more electropositive element
calcium carbide - a grey salt of calcium (CaC) used in making acetylene
inorganic compound - any compound that does not contain carbon
silicon carbide - an extremely hard blue-black crystalline compound (SiC) used as an abrasive and a heat refractory material; crystals of silicon carbide can be used as semiconductors
Translations

carbide

[ˈkɑːbaɪd] Ncarburo m

carbide

nKarbid nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Abrasive testing indicates the wear resistance is twice as good as typical chromium carbides.
The exceptional wear resistance of HCCIs is attributed primarily to the high volume fraction of hard eutectic chromium carbides [5, 6].
The combination of carbides in this application, equate to synchronized tool life, with even wear between the rotary die and the anvil.
Cambridge based tool engineer, C4 Carbides, recently commissioned an aqueous cleaning system from MecWash, to remove oil and dirt from the cutting edge of tools prior to adhering carbide and painting.
The carbides are a function of the steel-making process and are beneficial as regards wear resistance.
2] values for the cryogenic-treated carbides are less than for the untreated carbide, some transformation or changes probably resulted from the cryogenic treatment.
Most of the subsequent developments in the hard carbides have been modifications of the original patents, principally involving replacement of part or all of the tungsten carbide with other carbides, especially titanium carbide and/or tantalum carbide.
In principle, you can make all the carbides that exist," Dai says.
Pure tungsten carbide (WC) is brittle, and is therefore mainly used in sintered cemented carbides (CC).
8, which is etched, reveals carbides in the microstructure.