carbide

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car·bide

 (kär′bīd′)
n.
1. A binary compound consisting of carbon and a more electropositive element, especially calcium.
2. Any of various hard durable materials made of compacted binary compounds of carbon, especially those with silicon, boron, or a heavy metal, used as abrasives and in tools that cut metal.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carbide

(ˈkɑːbaɪd)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a binary compound of carbon with a more electropositive element. See also acetylide
2. (Elements & Compounds) See calcium carbide
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•bide

(ˈkɑr baɪd, -bɪd)

n.
1. a compound of carbon with a more electropositive element or group.
3. a very hard mixture of sintered carbides of various heavy metals, esp. tungsten carbide, used for cutting edges and dies.
[1860–65; carb (on) + -ide]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·bide

(kär′bīd′)
A chemical compound consisting of carbon and a metal, such as calcium or tungsten. Many carbides are very hard and are used to make cutting tools and abrasives.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Carbide

Calcium carbide. When water drips on calcium carbide, acetylene gas is formed. The acetylene can then be used as fuel for lights.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbide - a binary compound of carbon with a more electropositive element
calcium carbide - a grey salt of calcium (CaC) used in making acetylene
inorganic compound - any compound that does not contain carbon
silicon carbide - an extremely hard blue-black crystalline compound (SiC) used as an abrasive and a heat refractory material; crystals of silicon carbide can be used as semiconductors
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

carbide

[ˈkɑːbaɪd] Ncarburo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carbide

nKarbid nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Drop-In carbides are now available for all models of vertical shaft impactors [VSI] from Kolberg-Pioneer Inc.
The exceptional wear resistance of HCCIs is attributed primarily to the high volume fraction of hard eutectic chromium carbides [5, 6].
Cambridge based tool engineer, C4 Carbides, recently commissioned an aqueous cleaning system from MecWash, to remove oil and dirt from the cutting edge of tools prior to adhering carbide and painting.
Microstructure of cast high speed steel R6M5 (EBCHR) consists over grain boundaries of martensite (austenite grain score is 9-10), residual austenite, torn carbide network (carbide inhomogeneity score, according to GOST 19265-73 scale 2, is 6-7) and disperse carbides, uniformly distributed over the whole volume of ingots (Figure 1, a).
Essentially, Severson explains, "Tool steels are composed of a matrix, carbide volume, and non-metallic inclusions." The carbides are a function of the steel-making process and are beneficial as regards wear resistance.
1 and 2) indicate cryogenic-treated tungsten carbide wears less and slower than the untreated tungsten carbides.
Most of the subsequent developments in the hard carbides have been modifications of the original patents, principally involving replacement of part or all of the tungsten carbide with other carbides, especially titanium carbide and/or tantalum carbide.
They plan to continue studying possible applications and making nanorods out of different carbides. "In principle, you can make all the carbides that exist," Dai says.
Unlike straight tungsten carbides, which are heavy and forced to the bottom of the weld puddle, the composition of Postalloy PS-150 is ideally balanced to provide a uniform distribution of vanadium-tungsten carbides throughout a tough steel matrix that takes more impact than both chromium and tungsten carbides.
Pure tungsten carbide (WC) is brittle, and is therefore mainly used in sintered cemented carbides (CC).
8, which is etched, reveals carbides in the microstructure.