carbon nanotube

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carbon nanotube

n.
The most common form of nanotube, composed entirely of carbon atoms or cylindrical fullerenes, with numerous applications in nanotechnology.
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Noun1.carbon nanotube - a fullerene molecule having a cylindrical or toroidal shape
fullerene - a form of carbon having a large molecule consisting of an empty cage of sixty or more carbon atoms
References in periodicals archive ?
The sheet is composed of pure(1) carbon nanotubes, oriented perpendicularly, resulting in exceptional thermal conductivity and heat resistance.
Researchers at the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology have developed a novel type of buckypaper a thin film composed of carbon nanotubes that has better thermal and electrical properties than most types of buckypaper previously developed.
The Carbon Nanotubes Global Opportunity Report spread across 670 pages includes assessment of the Carbon Nanotubes Market including production volumes, competitive landscape, commercial prospects, applications, commercialization timelines, prices and producer profiles.
Carbon nanotubes have high potential in biological applications such as tissue engineering and simulation of bone structure and properties due to their unique physical and mechanical properties.
Carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that are long thin carbon wire, about a nanometer across, but up to many thousands of times longer-possess exciting mechanical, optical and electrical properties that would that make them ideal for nanoscale materials [1].
PEEK is being reinforced with carbon nanotubes for injection moulding by a compounder in the USA.
Washington, June 2 (ANI): Scientists are looking at the possibility of replacing silicon transistors in computers with carbon nanotubes.
Carbon nanotubes are cylinders made out of carbon atoms, with a diameter of 1 to 2 nanometers.
Carbon nanotubes have many structures, differing in length, thickness, type of helicity and number of layers.
This development demonstrates the feasibility of using carbon nanotubes as high-speed transistors--a significant step as the nanotubes consume only one-thousandth the power of today's current transistors.
Although carbon nanotubes usually clump in water, they readily disperse when the water contains natural organic matter, researchers report.