carbon fixation

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carbon fixation

n
(Botany) the process by which plants assimilate carbon from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to form metabolically active compounds
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

carbon fixation

The process by which carbon from the atmosphere is converted into carbon compounds, such as carbohydrates, in plants and algae, usually by photosynthesis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbon assimilation and distribution and vine cold hardiness: sourcesink interaction
Among the fluorescence parameters, Fv/Fm and yield are considered as the most relevant because they indicate the functioning of photosystem II (PSII) and, consequently, the efficiency in the use of photochemical radiation in carbon assimilation by plants.
Increasing photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants to improve crop yield: current and future strategies.
The high stomatal control typical of isohydric species has possibly affected the carbon assimilation rate of the treated plants and consequently their growth.
For example, it is a general trend that rates of carbon assimilation and specific leaf area under nursery conditions of shade-intolerant and tolerant species vary accordingly with the behavior found under natural conditions (Aleric & Kirkman, 2005).
Impacts of drought stress on water relations and carbon assimilation in grass land species at different altitudes.
The response of carbon assimilation rate to leaf internal concentration of CO2 (A/Ci) was determined in the growth chamber using the Li-6400 Portable Photosynthesis System (LI-COR, Inc., USA), with three replicates for each biotype.
Land Management Implications of Carbon Assimilation Rate Differences among Plant Communities--Measurement Process.
Both canopy transpiration and C[O.sub.2] uptake are jointly controlled by leaf stomata, and therefore carbon assimilation and water use by plants can be tightly coupled.