auscultation

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Related to Cardiac auscultation: pulmonary auscultation

aus·cul·ta·tion

 (ô′skəl-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of listening.
2. Medicine The act of listening for sounds made by internal organs, as the heart and lungs, to aid in the diagnosis of certain disorders.

[Latin auscultātiō, auscultātiōn-, from auscultātus, past participle of auscultāre, to listen to; see ous- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

auscultation

(ˌɔːskəlˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Medicine) the diagnostic technique in medicine of listening to the various internal sounds made by the body, usually with the aid of a stethoscope
2. the act of listening
[C19: from Latin auscultātiō a listening, from auscultāre to listen attentively; related to Latin auris ear]
auscultatory, auscultative adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

aus•cul•ta•tion

(ˌɔ skəlˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of listening, either directly or through a stethoscope or other instrument, to sounds within the body as a method of diagnosis.
[1625–35; < Latin auscultātiō act of listening <ausultāre to listen <ausouris ear]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auscultation - listening to sounds within the body (usually with a stethoscope)auscultation - listening to sounds within the body (usually with a stethoscope)
diagnostic procedure, diagnostic technique - a procedure followed in making a medical diagnosis
pleximetry, percussion - tapping a part of the body for diagnostic purposes
succussion - shaking a person to determine whether a large amount of liquid is present in a body cavity
listening, hearing - the act of hearing attentively; "you can learn a lot by just listening"; "they make good music--you should give them a hearing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

auscultation

nAbhören nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aus·cul·ta·tion

n. auscultación, acto de auscultar, detección de sonidos en un examen directo o por medio del estetoscopio.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The high venous pressure leads to the distension of the jugular veins (Kussmaul-sign) the cardiac sounds are "mufied." In addition, the peripherial pulse cannot be palpated while cardiac auscultation detects heartbeats, this is referred as pulsus paradoxus.
On cardiac auscultation, heart sounds were heard on right side.
Cardiac auscultation revealed regular heart rate and rhythm, no murmurs or gallops.
The patient was tachycardic with a regular rhythm and without murmur on cardiac auscultation, his lungs were clear to auscultation bilaterally without rales, rhonchi, or wheezing, and his abdomen was soft, nontender, and nondistended.
Patients presenting with dyspnea, cyanosis and syncope without obvious changes in cardiac auscultation should also be investigated for pulmonary hypertension (PH).
Cardiac auscultation. A glorious past--but does it have a future?
Cardiac auscultation revealed a loud pulmonary component of the second heart sound with parasternal heave.
At 5 months of age, she was admitted due to signs of heart failure and respiratory distress, with a click and pansystolic murmur of mitral regurgitation on cardiac auscultation. She was started on medical heart failure therapy (captopril, spironolactone, and furosemide) and was discharged home following improvement.
Concurrent cardiac auscultation revealed a grade II/VI holosystolic murmur that was loudest over the left lower sternal border.
There was a grade III-IV holosystolic murmur over the apex on cardiac auscultation. Initial laboratory results showed severe leukocytosis, with a leukocyte count of 23,790 and hemoglobin level of 7.7 g/dL.
The disease was clinically characterized by anorexia, gastrointestinal disturbances, varying temperature (102.6 to 1040F), weight loss, epistaxis, cutaneous haemorrhages, melena, respiratory distress and arrhythmia on cardiac auscultation as observed in other studies also at home and abroad.