cardia

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car·di·a

 (kär′dē-ə)
n. pl. car·di·ae (-dē-ē′) or car·di·as
1. The opening of the esophagus into the stomach.
2. The upper portion of the stomach that adjoins this opening.

[Greek kardiā, heart, cardiac orifice of the stomach; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cardia

(ˈkɑːdɪə)
n
a lower oesophageal sphincter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•di•a

(ˈkɑr di ə)

n., pl. -di•ae (-diˌi)
-di•as.
an opening that connects the esophagus and the upper part of the stomach.
[1775–85; < New Latin < Greek kardía, literally, heart]

-cardia

a combining form occurring in words that denote an anomalous or undesirable action or position of the heart, as specified by the initial element: tachycardia.
[perhaps orig. representing Greek kardía heart, though coincidence with the abstract n. suffix -ia has influenced sense]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cardia - the opening into the stomach and that part of the stomach connected to the esophagus
orifice, porta, opening - an aperture or hole that opens into a bodily cavity; "the orifice into the aorta from the lower left chamber of the heart"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cardia

n. cardia, desembocadura del esófago en el estómago.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Valvuloseptal hypercellularity may narrow the cardiac orifices, which reduces blood flow through the heart, thereby compromising cardiac output and contributing to increased mortality.