cardinal vowels

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cardinal vowels

pl n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a set of theoretical vowel sounds, based on the shape of the mouth needed to articulate them, that can be used to classify the vowel sounds of any speaker in any language
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The vowel is usually around cardinal vowel two, but may also be slightly more open.
For the sound stimuli, cardinal vowels were taken from an Interactive CD containing a clickable cardinal vowel chart created by the Department of Phonetics and Linguistics at University College London.
For example, in the discussion of the cardinal vowels, it was noted that the cardinal vowel [i] actually represents a range of sounds that are high front sounds.
If this vowel was about as high as cardinal vowel 2, the change from /i/ to /e:/ would involve both a lengthening and a fronting process; if, however, /i/ was higher than cardinal vowel 2, the change from /i/ to /e:/ would involve both a lengthening and a lowering process.
In most languages, the vowels employing cardinal vowel symbols ([i], [e], [u], [[??]], [a], etc.) are usually centralized to a degree from the "extreme" cardinal positions.
The vowel /el is below the cardinal vowel 2 and / l is above the cardinal vowel 3.
Like English, the quality of most vowels simply do not line up with Jones's cardinal vowel positions, even though one is obliged to choose the one deemed to be the closest symbol.
Following this tradition, the vowels of Hindko are described below with reference to Cardinal vowel system, which is first discussed below.
It will also be noticed that vowels with the same symbol are not necessarily articulated in exactly the same location between F and E, and rarely occupy the extreme cardinal vowel position.
[i] is a fully close central unrounded vowel, midway between cardinal vowels 1 [i] and 8 [u].
He says that the idea of the Cardinal Vowels by Daniel Jones is based on the concept that the vowels are limited by vowel space.