cardinal

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car·di·nal

 (kär′dn-əl, kärd′nəl)
adj.
1. Of foremost importance; paramount: a cardinal rule; cardinal sins.
2. Dark to deep or vivid red.
n.
1. Abbr. Card. Roman Catholic Church A high church official, ranking just below the pope, who has been appointed by a pope to membership in the College of Cardinals.
2. A dark to deep or vivid red.
3. A North American bird (Cardinalis cardinalis) having a crested head, a short thick bill, and bright red plumage in the male.
4. A short hooded cloak, originally of scarlet cloth, worn by women in the 1700s.
5. A cardinal number.

[Middle English, from Late Latin cardinālis, principal, pivotal, from Latin, serving as a hinge, from cardō, cardin-, hinge.]

car′di·nal·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cardinal

(ˈkɑːdɪnəl)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church any of the members of the Sacred College, ranking next after the pope, who elect the pope and act as his chief counsellors
2. (Colours) Also called: cardinal red a deep vivid red colour
3. (Mathematics) See cardinal number
4. (Animals) Also called: cardinal grosbeak or redbird (US)a crested North American bunting, Richmondena (or Pyrrhuloxia) cardinalis, the male of which has a bright red plumage and the female a brown one
5. (Animals) a fritillary butterfly, Pandoriana pandora, found in meadows of southern Europe
6. (Clothing & Fashion) a woman's hooded shoulder cape worn in the 17th and 18th centuries
adj
7. (usually prenominal) fundamentally important; principal: cardinal sin.
8. (Colours) of a deep vivid red colour
9. (Anatomy) astrology of or relating to the signs Aries, Cancer, Libra, and Capricorn. Compare mutable2, fixed10
[C13: from Latin cardinālis, literally: relating to a hinge, hence, that on which something depends, principal, from cardō hinge]
ˈcardinally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•di•nal

(ˈkɑr dn l)

adj.
1. of prime importance; chief; principal.
2. of the color cardinal.
n.
3. a high ecclesiastic appointed by the pope to the College of Cardinals.
4. a common crested songbird, Cardinalis cardinalis, of North America, the male of which is bright red.
5. a deep, rich red color.
6. a woman's short scarlet cloak with a hood, worn in the 18th century.
[before 1150; < Latin cardinālis <cardō hinge]
car′di•nal•ly, adv.
car′di•nal•ship`, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cardinal

One of the three qualities; associated with receptivity, initiative and executive action.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cardinal - (Roman Catholic Church) one of a group of more than 100 prominent bishops in the Sacred College who advise the Pope and elect new Popescardinal - (Roman Catholic Church) one of a group of more than 100 prominent bishops in the Sacred College who advise the Pope and elect new Popes
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
College of Cardinals, Sacred College - (Roman Catholic Church) the body of cardinals who advise the Pope and elect new Popes
bishop - a senior member of the Christian clergy having spiritual and administrative authority; appointed in Christian churches to oversee priests or ministers; considered in some churches to be successors of the twelve Apostles of Christ
dean - (Roman Catholic Church) the head of the College of Cardinals
2.cardinal - the number of elements in a mathematical set; denotes a quantity but not the order
number - a concept of quantity involving zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence"
absolute frequency, frequency - the number of observations in a given statistical category
googol - a cardinal number represented as 1 followed by 100 zeros (ten raised to the power of a hundred)
googolplex - a cardinal number represented as 1 followed by a googol of zeros (ten raised to the power of a googol)
3.cardinal - a variable color averaging a vivid redcardinal - a variable color averaging a vivid red
red, redness - red color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
4.cardinal - crested thick-billed North American finch having bright red plumage in the malecardinal - crested thick-billed North American finch having bright red plumage in the male
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
Adj.1.cardinal - serving as an essential component; "a cardinal rule"; "the central cause of the problem"; "an example that was fundamental to the argument"; "computers are fundamental to modern industrial structure"
important, of import - of great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"
2.cardinal - being or denoting a numerical quantity but not order; "cardinal numbers"
ordinal - being or denoting a numerical order in a series; "ordinal numbers"; "held an ordinal rank of seventh"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cardinal

adjective principal, first, highest, greatest, leading, important, chief, main, prime, central, key, essential, primary, fundamental, paramount, foremost, pre-eminent As a salesman, your cardinal rule is to do everything you can to satisfy the customer.
lowest, secondary, subordinate, least important, dispensable, inessential
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

cardinal

adjective
Most important, influential, or significant:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
أصْليكاردينال
kardinálpodstatnýhlavní
kardinalkardinal-
kardinaaliperuslukupunakardinaali
bíboros
höfuî-, megin-kardináli
基本
kardinolaskiekiniai skaitvardžiai
galvenaiskardināls
kardinál
kardinal
en önemlikardinaltemel
lượngsố lượng

cardinal

[ˈkɑːdɪnl]
A. ADJcardinal
a cardinal ruleuna regla primordial or fundamental
of cardinal importancede capital importancia
B. N (Rel) → cardenal m
C. CPD cardinal number N (Math) → número m cardinal
cardinal point Npunto m cardinal
cardinal sin N (Rel) → pecado m capital
cardinal virtue Nvirtud f cardinal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cardinal

[ˈkɑːrdnəl]
adj [rule] → cardinal(e)
n (= cleric) → cardinal mcardinal sin npéché m capitalcard index nfichier m (alphabétique)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cardinal

n
(Eccl) → Kardinal m
adj (= chief)Haupt-; (= utmost)äußerste(r, s) attr

cardinal

:
cardinal number
nKardinalzahl f
cardinal points
cardinal red
nPurpurrot nt
cardinal sin
nTodsünde f
cardinal virtue
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cardinal

[ˈkɑːdɪnl] adj & ncardinale (m)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cardinal

(ˈkaːdənl) adjective
chief; principal. cardinal sins.
noun
(the status of) one of the men next in rank to the Pope in the Roman Catholic Church.
cardinal numbers numbers expressing quantity (1,2,3 etc). See also ordinal numbers
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
the din of all the great double petards of the Saint-Jean, the discharge of twenty arquebuses on supports, the detonation of that famous serpentine of the Tower of Billy, which, during the siege of Paris, on Sunday, the twenty-sixth of September, 1465, killed seven Burgundians at one blow, the explosion of all the powder stored at the gate of the Temple, would have rent his ears less rudely at that solemn and dramatic moment, than these few words, which fell from the lips of the usher, "His eminence, Monseigneur the Cardinal de Bourbon."
It is not that Pierre Gringoire either feared or disdained monsieur the cardinal. He had neither the weakness nor the audacity for that.
There was then neither hatred for the cardinal, nor disdain for his presence, in the disagreeable impression produced upon Pierre Gringoire.
This man was Armand Jean Duplessis, Cardinal de Richelieu; not such as he is now represented--broken down like an old man, suffering like a martyr, his body bent, his voice failing, buried in a large armchair as in an anticipated tomb; no longer living but by the strength of his genius, and no longer maintaining the struggle with Europe but by the eternal application of his thoughts--but such as he really was at this period; that is to say, an active and gallant cavalier, already weak of body, but sustained by that moral power which made of him one of the most extraordinary men that ever lived, preparing, after having supported the Duc de Nevers in his duchy of Mantua, after having taken Nimes, Castres, and Uzes, to drive the English from the Isle of Re and lay siege to La Rochelle.
At first sight, nothing denoted the cardinal; and it was impossible for those who did not know his face to guess in whose presence they were.
At the end of ten minutes of reading and ten seconds of examination, the cardinal was satisfied.
In a splendid chamber of the Palais Royal, formerly styled the Palais Cardinal, a man was sitting in deep reverie, his head supported on his hands, leaning over a gilt and inlaid table which was covered with letters and papers.
Any one who happened at that moment to contemplate that red simar -- the gorgeous robe of office -- and the rich lace, or who gazed on that pale brow, bent in anxious meditation, might, in the solitude of that apartment, combined with the silence of the ante-chambers and the measured paces of the guards upon the landing-place, have fancied that the shade of Cardinal Richelieu lingered still in his accustomed haunt.
The Earl of Essex, 'tis true, wore a splendid ring, set with diamonds, given him by his royal mistress, whilst I -- I have nothing but a simple circlet of gold, with a cipher on it and a date; but that ring has been blessed in the chapel of the Palais Royal,* so they will never ruin me, as they long to do, and whilst they shout,`Down with Mazarin!' I, unknown, and unperceived by them, incite them to cry out, `Long live the Duke de Beaufort' one day; another, `Long live the Prince de Conde;' and again,`Long live the parliament!'" And at this word the smile on the cardinal's lips assumed an expression of hatred, of which his mild countenance seemed incapable.
All eyes, after having admired the young king, so handsome and so agreeable, sought for that other king of France, much otherwise king than the former, and so old, so pale, so bent, that people called him the Cardinal Mazarin.
Certes, he was already quite a king, and it was a great thing to be a king in that period of traditional devotedness and respect; but as, up to that time, he had been but seldom and always poorly shown to the people, as they to whom he was shown saw him by the side of his mother, a tall woman, and monsieur le cardinal, a man of commanding presence, many found him so little of a king as to say, --
"Why, the king is not so tall as monsieur le cardinal!"