house of cards

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house of cards

n. pl. houses of cards
A flimsy structure, arrangement, or situation that is in danger of collapsing or failing: "The collapse of the rupiah ... has brought down a house of cards in overleveraged conglomerates" (Sander Thoenes).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

house of cards

n
1. (Card Games) a tiered structure created by balancing playing cards on their edges
2. an unstable situation, plan, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

house′ of cards′


n.
a structure or plan that is insubstantial and subject to imminent collapse.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.house of cards - a speculative scheme that depends on unstable factors that the planner cannot control; "his proposal was nothing but a house of cards"; "a real estate bubble"
scheme, strategy - an elaborate and systematic plan of action
2.house of cards - an unstable construction with playing cards; "he built three levels of his cardcastle before it collapsed"
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
korttitalo
castello di carte
References in periodicals archive ?
"This is my largest cardstacking challenge to date and the only card creation I have ever made at full human scale," Berg added about the hotel.
Item: at the ACIS conference in New York (2006), Elizabeth Cullingford delivered a plenary address entitled "Evil, Sin, and Doubt: What is at Stake in Representations of Clerical Abuse?" which displayed cardstacking and prejudice unworthy of any academic setting.