Carlist


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Car·list

 (kär′lĭst)
n.
A supporter of Don Carlos, the pretender to the Spanish throne, or his heirs.

Car′list adj.

Carlist

(ˈkɑːlɪst)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in Spain) a supporter of Don Carlos or his descendants as the rightful kings of Spain
2. (Historical Terms) (in France) a supporter of Charles X or his descendants
ˈCarlism n
Translations

Carlist

[ˈkɑːlɪst]
A. ADJcarlista
B. Ncarlista mf
References in classic literature ?
But it was a Carlist salon, and as such we were made welcome.
For she was a Carlist, and of Basque blood at that, with something of a lioness in the expression of her courageous face (especially when she let her hair down), and with the volatile little soul of a sparrow dressed in fine Parisian feathers, which had the trick of coming off disconcertingly at unexpected moments.
She had an uncle still living, a very effective Carlist, too, the priest of a little mountain parish in Guipuzcoa.
At once it occurred to Mills that this eccentric youngster was the very person for what the legitimist sympathizers had very much at heart just then: to organize a supply by sea of arms and ammunition to the Carlist detachments in the South.
To own the truth to you, I am a Carlist, as all genteel articles are, and I enter but little into the subject of Louis Philippe's reign."
Dubbed "The Pretender" by those who rejected his claim, Carlos V in 1833 launched the first of four Carlist Wars, a split between members of the Royal Family that was mirrored in Spanish society.
Feced volunteered to fight against the Carlist traditionalists; 'Pablo Feced', in Enciclopedia universal, p.
This led to the Carlist Wars but that's another story.
"Barbarism in the first Carlist war" by Mario Cuevas Fernndez and Carlos Jimnez Cornago of IES Valle del Ebro (Tudela, Navarra),
[en] The direct socioeconomic consequences of the First Carlist War
The First Steps of the Catholic Social Action in Zamora and the Involvement of the Carlist leaders (1891-1912)
Gil Gonzalez explains that "The political and ideological instrumentation of the comic strip had already been tested in Spain during the Civil War by tebeos such as the Falangist Flechas or the Carlist Pelayos."