Carolingian Renaissance


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Carolingian Renaissance

n.
A revival of classical art and architecture in parts of northern and western Europe begun under Charlemagne and lasting into the 10th century.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The sources come from the Hellenistic period and Roman Republic, the High Roman Empire, the Carolingian Renaissance, and Byzantium.
Poggio's recovery of De rerum natura builds on the humanism and verve of his near-contemporary, Petrarch, as well as the Carolingian renaissance (in the 8th and 9th centuries), in which, as in Poggio's time, innovations in the system and style of writing were quite literally bound into the classical humanist texts of antiquity.
The travellers and carriers of books are for the most part English but, as is fitting in a paper written for Eamonn O Carragain's Festschrift, Parkes points to the importance of the "synchronizing of Irish and Roman cultures in England" at this time in bringing about "an intellectual renovatio" its effects contributing "substantially to the Carolingian renaissance.
The first chapter begins with Rome and Italy after Constantine had moved the capital and in a few pages gives an overview of the rest of the book: the growth of Christian writing and scholarship, scriptoria, the crucial role of monks and monasteries, the Carolingian Renaissance, and the rise of universities.
He rapidly surveys early Christianity, the conversion of the barbarians, the Carolingian Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation and its "successor movements" of revivalism and social reform in America; these are historical instances of deep social change driven by the conscious effort to create alternative structures, not just by a shift in ideals.
In the first seven chapters, Pedersen explores this "give and take" beginning with the birth of science, the early church fathers, the Carolingian Renaissance, medieval science and theology, and ending with the early modern science of Isaac Newton.
In fact, it wasn't until the 8th and 9th centuries, the period of the Carolingian Renaissance, that representations of Christ's body began to routinely appear on crosses.
It would be worthwhile to direct a PhD dissertation comparing Carolingian Renaissance in the eight and ninth centuries to the Polish Renaissance in the sixteenth century.
Among their topics are the long shadow of the Merovingians, Charlemagne's government, the Carolingian renaissance of culture and learning, coinage, and rural settlement hierarchy.