Cartesian coordinate system

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Cartesian coordinate system
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Cartesian coordinate system

n.
A coordinate system in which the coordinates of a point are its distances from a set of perpendicular lines that intersect at an origin, such as two lines in a plane or three in space.

Car·te·sian coordinate system

(kär-tē′zhən)
A system in which the location of a point is given by coordinates that represent its distances from perpendicular lines that intersect at a point called the origin. A Cartesian coordinate system in a plane has two perpendicular lines (the x-axis and y-axis); in three-dimensional space, it has three (the x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis).
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Noun1.Cartesian coordinate system - a coordinate system for which the coordinates of a point are its distances from a set perpendicular lines that intersect at the origin of the system
coordinate system, frame of reference, reference frame, reference system - a system that uses coordinates to establish position
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cartesian equation of the curve is then [x.sup.2]y = 4[a.sup.2] (2a - y).
What emerges clearly as well is the fact that, however non-rational and threatening these paranormal powers become, they nonetheless continue to function (even if in a perverse fashion) as an avatar of mind in the Cartesian equation. For they clearly comprise an entity that, never explained in scientific terms, remains qualitatively different from the material brain it is said to 'invade'.
The next task is to find the Cartesian equation of each branch, which requires getting an expression for y in terms of x.