Carthage


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Related to Carthage: Punic Wars

Car·thage

 (kär′thĭj)
An ancient city and state of northern Africa on the Bay of Tunis northeast of modern Tunis. It was founded by the Phoenicians in the ninth century bc and became the center of a maritime empire in the Mediterranean after the sixth century bc. The city was destroyed by the Romans at the end of the Third Punic War (146 bc) but was rebuilt by Julius Caesar and later (ad 439-533) served as capital of the Vandals before its virtual annihilation by the Arabs (698).

Car′tha·gin′i·an (kär′thə-jĭn′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Carthage

(ˈkɑːθɪdʒ)
n
(Placename) an ancient city state, on the N African coast near present-day Tunis. Founded about 800 bc by Phoenician traders, it grew into an empire dominating N Africa and the Mediterranean. Destroyed and then rebuilt by Rome, it was finally razed by the Arabs in 697 ad. See also Punic Wars

Car•thage

(ˈkɑr θɪdʒ)

n.
an ancient city-state in N Africa near modern Tunis: founded by the Phoenicians in the 9th cent. B.C.; destroyed 146 B.C. in the last Punic War.
Car•tha•gin•i•an (ˌkɑr θəˈdʒɪn i ən) n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Carthage - an ancient city state on the north African coast near modern Tunis; founded by Phoenicians; destroyed and rebuilt by Romans; razed by Arabs in 697
Phenicia, Phoenicia - an ancient maritime country (a collection of city states) at eastern end of the Mediterranean
Carthaginian - a native or inhabitant of ancient Carthage
Translations
قرطاج
Картаген
Cartago
Kartágo
Karthago
Kartago
Kartaago
Karthago
קרתגו
Kartaga
Karthágó
Kartago
Karþagó
カルタゴ
Karthago
Kartagina
Kartāga
Karthago
Kartagina
Cartago
Cartagina
Kartágo
Kartagina
Картагина
Karthago
Karthago
Kartaca
Карфаген

Carthage

[ˈkɑːθɪdʒ] NCartago f

Carthage

nKarthago nt

Carthage

[ˈkɑːθɪdʒ] nCartagine f
References in classic literature ?
The government of Carthage seems well established, and in many respects superior to others; in some particulars it bears a near resemblance to the Lacedaemonians; and indeed these three states, the Cretans, the Lacedaemonians and the Carthaginians are in some things very like each other, in others they differ greatly.
Sparta, Athens, Rome, and Carthage were all republics; two of them, Athens and Carthage, of the commercial kind.
The Romans, in order to hold Capua, Carthage, and Numantia, dismantled them, and did not lose them.
Besides though New Bedford has of late been gradually monopolizing the business of whaling, and though in this matter poor old Nantucket is now much behind her, yet Nantucket was her great original --the Tyre of this Carthage; --the place where the first dead American whale was stranded.
In the year 1861 Barr Lassiter, a young man of twenty-two, lived with his parents and an elder sister near Carthage, Tennessee.
Thus he learned that, after long persecutions, Smith reappeared in Illinois, and in 1839 founded a community at Nauvoo, on the Mississippi, numbering twenty-five thousand souls, of which he became mayor, chief justice, and general-in-chief; that he announced himself, in 1843, as a candidate for the Presidency of the United States; and that finally, being drawn into ambuscade at Carthage, he was thrown into prison, and assassinated by a band of men disguised in masks.
Lusitania had a Viriatus, Rome a Caesar, Carthage a Hannibal, Greece an Alexander, Castile a Count Fernan Gonzalez, Valencia a Cid, Andalusia a Gonzalo Fernandez, Estremadura a Diego Garcia de Paredes, Jerez a Garci Perez de Vargas, Toledo a Garcilaso, Seville a Don Manuel de Leon, to read of whose valiant deeds will entertain and instruct the loftiest minds and fill them with delight and wonder.
'On the 27th ult., in an affray near Carthage, Leake county, Mississippi, between James Cottingham and John Wilburn, the latter was shot by the former, and so horribly wounded, that there was no hope of his recovery.
In such a way Babylon rose and fell, and Nineveh, and Thebes, and Carthage, and Rome.
Ere long Marseilles presented herself to view, -- Marseilles, white, fervid, full of life and energy, -- Marseilles, the younger sister of Tyre and Carthage, the successor to them in the empire of the Mediterranean, -- Marseilles, old, yet always young.
This thought has let states with a limited territorial basis like Tyre, Carthage, Venice, Holland, and England, for instance, to secure the carrying trade.
"A strapper--a real strapper, Jane: big, brown, and buxom; with hair just such as the ladies of Carthage must have had.