cartilage

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car·ti·lage

 (kär′tl-ĭj)
n.
A tough, elastic, fibrous connective tissue that is a major constituent of the embryonic and young vertebrate skeleton and in most species is converted largely to bone with maturation. It is found in various parts of the human body, such as the joints, outer ear, and larynx.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cartilāgō, cartilāgin-.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cartilage

(ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ; ˈkɑːtlɪdʒ)
n
(Anatomy) a tough elastic tissue composing most of the embryonic skeleton of vertebrates. In the adults of higher vertebrates it is mostly converted into bone, remaining only on the articulating ends of bones, in the thorax, trachea, nose, and ears. Nontechnical name: gristle
[C16: from Latin cartilāgō]
cartilaginous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•ti•lage

(ˈkɑr tl ɪdʒ, ˈkɑrt lɪdʒ)

n.
1. a firm, elastic, whitish type of connective tissue; gristle.
2. a part or structure composed of cartilage.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin cartilāgō gristle]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·ti·lage

(kär′tl-ĭj)
A strong, flexible connective tissue that is found in various parts of the body, including the joints, the outer ear, and the larynx. In the early development of most vertebrates, the skeleton forms as cartilage before most of it hardens into bone.

cartilaginous adjective
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cartilage

Gristle; dense, white connective tissue cushioning bones and supporting parts of the ear and respiratory system.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cartilage - tough elastic tissue; mostly converted to bone in adults
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
meniscus, semilunar cartilage - (anatomy) a disk of cartilage that serves as a cushion between the ends of bones that meet at a joint
fibrocartilage - cartilage that is largely composed of fibers like those in ordinary connective tissue
hyaline cartilage - translucent cartilage that is common in joints and the respiratory passages; forms most of the fetal skeleton
arytaenoid, arytenoid, arytenoid cartilage - either of two small cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal folds are attached
thyroid cartilage, Adam's apple - the largest cartilage of the larynx
cartilaginous structure - body structure given shape by cartilage
ground substance, intercellular substance, matrix - the body substance in which tissue cells are embedded
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
غضْروف
chrupavka
brusk
rusto
brjósk
軟骨
cartilago
kremzlė
skrimslis
chrupavka
kıkırdakkıkırdak doku

cartilage

[ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ] Ncartílago m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cartilage

[ˈkɑːrtɪlɪdʒ] n (ANATOMY)cartilage m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cartilage

nKnorpel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cartilage

[ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ] ncartilagine f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cartilage

(ˈkaːtəlidʒ) noun
a firm elastic substance found in the bodies of men and animals.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

car·ti·lage

n. cartílago, tejido semiduro que cubre los huesos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cartilage

n cartílago
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Commissioner Marin had only recently been forced to give up his soccer activities due to cartilege trouble and he still enthusiastically follows the game in the Iberian Peninsula."
Over time, pressures on these regions contribute to chronic pain and raise the risk of injury and osteoarthritis (a degenerative joint disease that develops when the cartilege between joints breaks down).
"Darren Torpey is on holiday from next week but he is the only one." Steve Jones remains sidelined with a cartilege problem in his knee.
Scientists at the Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Organ Fabrication at Massachusetts General Hospital have used a titanium frame to regrow ears from sheep cartilege.
Mark hates operations and even quit playing non-league football himself when he was faced with operations to repair damaged cartilege in his knees.
The Robins, however, cannot call upon Calum Benson (groin), Phil Cartwright (hamstring), Robbie Livermore (groin) or Michael Steinmetz (cartilege).
Now that the doctor has ruled out a labral tear of her hip cartilege, he wants her to stop dancing for a while to eliminate whatever is irritating her joints.
And Birmingham City keeper Colin Doyle will also miss the two games in Portugal tomorrow and Monday after suffering a cartilege tear in his knee.
In his first drawing of the Borghese Gladiator, made in about 1780, we see a body as muscular as something by Fuseli or Blake, with strongly delineated sinews and knobbly cartilege. But there is also a more considered 'Canova-ised' version made 14 years later, the heavy torso neutralised and pared down.
As well as the nose injury, Abdul, above, tore cartilege in her toe.