carving

(redirected from Carvings)
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Related to Carvings: Stone carvings, Wood carvings

carv·ing

 (kär′vĭng)
n.
1. The cutting of material such as stone or wood to form a figure or design.
2. A figure or design formed by this kind of cutting.

carving

(ˈkɑːvɪŋ)
n
(Art Terms) a figure or design produced by carving stone, wood, etc.

carv•ing

(ˈkɑr vɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of fashioning or producing by cutting into or shaping solid material.
2. a carved design or figure.
[1225–75]

carving

Sculpture creation by “subtracting” or removing extraneous material to create the finished work. Compare assemblage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carving - a sculpture created by removing material (as wood or ivory or stone) in order to create a desired shapecarving - a sculpture created by removing material (as wood or ivory or stone) in order to create a desired shape
cinquefoil - an ornamental carving consisting of five arcs arranged in a circle
glyptic art, glyptography - carvings or engravings (especially on precious stones)
scrimshaw - a carving (or engraving) on whalebone, whale ivory, walrus tusk, etc., usually by American whalers
sculpture - a three-dimensional work of plastic art
vermiculation - a decoration consisting of wormlike carvings
woodcarving - a carving created by carving wood
2.carving - removing parts from hard material to create a desired pattern or shape
creating by removal - the act of creating by removing something
petroglyph - a carving or line drawing on rock (especially one made by prehistoric people)
truncation - the replacement of an edge or solid angle (as in cutting a gemstone) by a plane (especially by a plane that is equally inclined to the adjacent faces)
3.carving - creating figures or designs in three dimensions
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
modelling, modeling, moulding, molding - a preliminary sculpture in wax or clay from which a finished work can be copied
beaux arts, fine arts - the study and creation of visual works of art

carving

noun sculpture, model, statue, statuette It was a wood carving of a human hand.
Related words
adjective glyptic
Translations
نقْش، حفْر
řezba
billedskærerarbejde
faragás
útskurîur
plastikarezba
oymayontma

carving

[ˈkɑːvɪŋ]
A. N (= act) → tallado m; (= ornament) → talla f, escultura f
B. CPD carving knife Ncuchillo m de trinchar, trinchante m

carving

[ˈkɑːrvɪŋ] n
(= decoration) → sculpture f
(= object) → sculpture f
(= art) → sculpture fcarving knife ncouteau m à découpercar wash nstation f de lavage (de voitures)car-worker [ˈkɑrwɜːkər] nouvrier/ière m/f de l'industrie automobile

carving

n (Art: = thing carved) → Skulptur f; (in wood also) → (Holz)schnitzerei f; (= relief)Relief nt; (in wood) → Holzschnitt m

carving

[ˈkɑːvɪŋ] n (Art) (in wood, stone) → scultura

carve

(kaːv) verb
1. to make designs, shapes etc by cutting a piece of wood etc. A figure carved out of wood.
2. to cut up (meat) into slices. Father carved the joint.
ˈcarving noun
a design, ornament etc carved from wood, stone etc.
carve out
to achieve or gain (something). He carved out a career for himself.
References in classic literature ?
To my dismay I found that, unlike the ornamentation upon most Heliumetic structures, the edges of the carvings were quite generally rounded, so that at best my every hold was most precarious.
"Bits of old wood carvings from the pulpit, and panels from the chancel, and images from the organ-loft," said the clerk.
The commerce of Lucerne consists mainly in gimcrackery of the souvenir sort; the shops are packed with Alpine crystals, photographs of scenery, and wooden and ivory carvings. I will not conceal the fact that miniature figures of the Lion of Lucerne are to be had in them.
"The Priory at Christ church was a noble pile, but it was cold and bare, methinks, by one of these, with their frettings, and their carvings, and their traceries, as though some great ivy-plant of stone had curled and wantoned over the walls."
He partook ravenously, without restraint and decency, cutting thick slices with the sharp carving knife, and swallowing them without bread.
An ancient Hawaiian war-club or spear-paddle, in its full multiplicity and elaboration of carving, is as great a trophy of human perseverance as a Latin lexicon.
So he selected a fine, big pumpkin -- one with a lustrous, orange-red color -- and began carving it.
Our hero had his penknife in his hand, which he had drawn for the before-mentioned purpose of carving on the bark; when the girl coming near him, cryed out with a smile, "You don't intend to kill me, squire, I hope!"--"Why should you think I would kill you?" answered Jones.
He laid down the carving-knife and fork - being engaged in carving, at the moment - put his two hands into his disturbed hair, and appeared to make an extraordinary effort to lift himself up by it.
“Here is a turkey to carve; and I flatter myself that I understand carving a turkey, or, for that matter, a goose, as well as any man alive.—Mr.
It seemed to want a lot of carving. I struggled with it for about five minutes without making the slightest impression, and then Joe, who had been eating potatoes, wanted to know if it wouldn't be better for some one to do the job that understood carving.
One can distinguish on its ruins three sorts of lesions, all three of which cut into it at different depths; first, time, which has insensibly notched its surface here and there, and gnawed it everywhere; next, political and religious revolution, which, blind and wrathful by nature, have flung themselves tumultuously upon it, torn its rich garment of carving and sculpture, burst its rose windows, broken its necklace of arabesques and tiny figures, torn out its statues, sometimes because of their mitres, sometimes because of their crowns; lastly, fashions, even more grotesque and foolish, which, since the anarchical and splendid deviations of the Renaissance, have followed each other in the necessary decadence of architecture.