Case at bar

(Law) a case presently before the court; a case under argument.
See under Bar, n.
- L'Estrange.

See also: Bar, Case

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It therefore strikes the Court as disingenuous for Plaintiff to persist in his argument that the amount in controversy in the case at bar could not possibly exceed $5 million total.
case] is readily distinguishable from the case at bar.
the record reflected that Bobby had signed consent forms substantially similar to the one signed in the case at bar on at least seven prior admissions to SJH.
Accordingly, the court found that the case at bar was distinguishable from Sturgil.
In cases involving constitutional rights, state courts frequently rely on federal decisions and do not look to their state constitutions unless the case at bar involves a state-specific provision.
While the Seventh Circuit correctly applied appropriate Supreme Court precedent to the facts of the case at bar, the ruling in this case did little to advance the law for competing circuits surrounding sovereign immunity, as it failed to take the opportunity to adopt a strict test for determining waiver in an administrative appeals process.
In applying it to the case at bar, he reasoned as follows:
In the case at bar, the LOI was executed on September 21, the proposal was submitted on October 29, the deal was consummated on November 19, and the contract was awarded on July 8 of the following year.
In the case at bar, the defendant's palm print impressions will probably produce evidence relevant to the question of the defendant's guilt," Mr.
In the sad case at bar, Reagan believes, it makes far more sense for a court to apply the risk-utility test to decide whether, weighing the totality of a product's risks against the totality of its benefits, there was excess preventable risk so that it was unreasonable to sell the product.
In the case at bar, the benefits retained by S--including, for example, periodic payments made prior to his death, continued use of the transferred house and post-death payment of various debts and expenses-were clearly "substantial" and "present," as opposed to "speculative" or "contingent.
Counsel hereby asks the Court to dismiss the case at bar.