case study

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case study

n.
1. A detailed analysis of a person or group, especially as a model of medical, psychiatric, psychological, or social phenomena.
2.
a. A detailed intensive study of a unit, such as a corporation or a corporate division, that stresses factors contributing to its success or failure.
b. An exemplary or cautionary model; an instructive example: She is a case study in strong political leadership.

case study

n
the act or an instance of analysing one or more particular cases or case histories with a view to making generalizations

case′ stud′y


n.
1. (in the social sciences) an analytical study of the development of an individual unit, as a person, family, or social institution.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.case study - a careful study of some social unit (as a corporation or division within a corporation) that attempts to determine what factors led to its success or failurecase study - a careful study of some social unit (as a corporation or division within a corporation) that attempts to determine what factors led to its success or failure
report, written report, study - a written document describing the findings of some individual or group; "this accords with the recent study by Hill and Dale"
corp, corporation - a business firm whose articles of incorporation have been approved in some state
2.case study - a detailed analysis of a person or group from a social or psychological or medical point of view
analysis - an investigation of the component parts of a whole and their relations in making up the whole
Translations
případová studie
חקר מקרהמקרה בוחן

case study

[keɪs ˈstʌdɪ] ncasistica
References in periodicals archive ?
The case-study institutions were selected to include a mix of public, private, large, small, and minority-serving institutions.
Although Intelligent Skins has a more rigorous checklist of assessment criteria, it is significant that only half of the case-study buildings were able to provide energy performance data, meaning that iconic buildings by Foster, Piano et al are published without the evidence to support their 'intelligent' claims.
Although the case-study procedures differed somewhat between the NCEP and NICP research, both studies have used identical interviews of key respondents as a major case study procedure.