case law

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case law

n.
The law as established by decisions of courts, especially appellate courts in published opinions.

case law

n
(Law) law established by following judicial decisions given in earlier cases. Compare statute law See also precedent1

case′ law`


n.
law based on judicial decisions rather than legislative action.
[1860–65]

case law

Law based on previous judicial decisions and precedent rather than statutes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.case law - a system of jurisprudence based on judicial precedents rather than statutory laws; "common law originated in the unwritten laws of England and was later applied in the United States"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.case law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisionscase law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisions
service - (law) the acts performed by an English feudal tenant for the benefit of his lord which formed the consideration for the property granted to him
civil law - the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Only a handful of reported cases have addressed either of Missouris previous invasion of privacy statutes, and none of the caselaw involves a fact pattern quite like what Greitens is alleged to have done.
The Court of Appeals held that, because caselaw clearly established that an instruction regarding justifiable taking of a life should not be used if a defendant claims self-defense but denies an intent to kill, appellant established an error that was plain.
5) However, this overgeneralizes the caselaw because, of the three types of certification marks, those cases only refer to one specific type.
The upshot of this and other caselaw is that in order for the doctrine of frustration to apply, the supposedly frustrating event has to be calamitous rather than merely costly, inconvenient or unfortunate.
Caselaw--As statutory law continues to develop, caselaw is important and may be the only source of law for issues coming before a court.
The panel provided an overview of the practice guide, touching on the most recent maritime caselaw, circuit conflicts, and other matters of interest to maritime attorneys.
Although the Final Guidance is not legally binding and does not alter the obligations found in NEPA, CEQs implementing regulations, and applicable caselaw, CEQ continues to recommend an expansive analysis of GHG emissions and climate change in NEPA reviews that pushes and in some cases may exceed the limits imposed on federal agencies under CEQ regulations and established judicial precedents.
Volpe (4) in 1971, however, a vast and baroque caselaw elaborated the requirements of rational agency decisionmaking under the APA.
While caselaw is not definitive, it seems unlikely that CAD files would be considered tangible products.
The court found the substantial compliance and tacit consent doctrines did not waive or supplant the signature requirement "contained in the Code, the regulations, and almost a century of caselaw.
Supreme Court's caselaw recognizes abortion as inherently different from other medical procedures, because as the Court put it, "no other procedure involves the purposeful termination of a potential human life.
Since its passage in 1986, it has created a pile of confused caselaw and overzealous prosecutions.