cash flow

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cash flow

n.
1. The pattern of income and expenditures, as of a company or person, and the resulting availability of cash: The city improved its cash flow by borrowing against future revenues.
2. The cash receipts or net income from one or more assets for a given period, reckoned after taxes and other disbursements, and often used as a measure of corporate worth.

cash′-flow′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cash flow

n
1. (Accounting & Book-keeping) the movement of money into and out of a business
2. (Accounting & Book-keeping) a prediction of such movement over a given period
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cash′ flow`


n.
the actual cash available in a company to pay salaries, expenses, dividends, purchase new equipment, etc.; usu. the after-tax profit plus noncash charges, such as depreciation.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cash flow

The movement of money into and out of a business entity.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cash flow - the excess of cash revenues over cash outlays in a give period of time (not including non-cash expenses)
income - the financial gain (earned or unearned) accruing over a given period of time
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
fluxo de caixa

cash flow

nliquidità, cash-flow m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to overcome the problems associated with accrual accounting and to provide a more specific focus on the cash position of a business the Australian accounting profession introduced the Statement of Cash Flows. This resolved the lack of detail concerning cash flow and also provided for the creation of a new set of ratios which could be used to analyse the liquidity of a business.
Since the introduction of the Statement of Cash Flows a number of ratios have been developed and their use can best be described as evolving.
This past year marked the 30th anniversary of the statement of cash flows as a required financial statement.
Because the stock market tends to overvalue accounting earnings, there is a need to validate the quality of earnings that companies report by looking at its cash flows.
Asset evaluation usually involves the calculation of the net present value (NPV) which is the difference between the present value of the cash flows the asset is expected to generate and the present value of the cost of asset acquisition.
This study examines the consequences of comparative flexibility in classification choices within the statement of cash flows. International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are perceived to allow managers more flexibility than Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
The sensitivity of retained cash (3) to cash flows is one of the emerging issues of corporate finance.
When investors choose internally generated funds in the form of cash flows to finance their investment projects, they can quickly and independently implement their investment plans in the absence of any external constraints.
The statement of cash flows is one of the three key statements used to report and understand the performance of a business.
The acquisition advances Waste Management's (WM) growth strategy and aligns with the company's financial goals, including growth in earnings per share, margins, and cash flow. Specifically, Waste Management expects the addition of Advanced Disposal (ADSW) to: Expand Waste Management's Footprint and Customer Base.