Casimir effect

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Cas·i·mir effect

 (kăz′ə-mîr′)
n.
The effect of a net attractive force between objects in a vacuum, caused by the reduction of vacuum pressure in the space between the objects, where the wavelengths of vacuum fluctuations are more limited than in the space around the objects.

[After Hendrik Casimir (1909-2000), Dutch physicist who predicted its existence in collaboration with Dirk Polder (1919-2001), Dutch physicist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The advantage of using the self-normalizing matrix is that it allows the use of an iterative eigenvalue solver for the Casimir energy. In addition, this self-normalization greatly improves the numerical accuracy of the Casimir problem by removing numerical error due to cancellation.
Using the implementation of the A-EPA with point sampling [11,21], good results were achieved for both the Casimir energy and force.
Simple method for calculating the Casimir energy for a sphere.