cassava

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cas·sa·va

 (kə-sä′və)
n.
1. A shrubby tropical American plant (Manihot esculenta) widely grown for its large, tuberous, starchy roots.
2. The root of this plant, eaten as a staple food in the tropics only after leaching and drying to remove cyanide. Cassava starch is also the source of tapioca. In both senses also called manioc, yuca.

[Ultimately from Taíno casavi, flour from manioc.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cassava

(kəˈsɑːvə)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: manioc any tropical euphorbiaceous plant of the genus Manihot, esp the widely cultivated American species M. esculenta (or utilissima) (bitter cassava) and M. dulcis (sweet cassava)
2. (Cookery) a starch derived from the root of this plant: an important food in the tropics and a source of tapioca
[C16: from Spanish cazabe cassava bread, from Taino caçábi]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cas•sa•va

(kəˈsɑ və)

n., pl. -vas.
1. any of several tropical American plants belonging to the genus Manihot, of the spurge family, having tuberous roots.
2. a nutritious starch from the roots, the source of tapioca.
[1545–55; < Sp cazabe cassava bread or meal < Taino]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cassava

A root vegetable resembling a large, brown sweet potato.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cassava - a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plantcassava - a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plant; the source of tapioca; a staple food in the tropics
tapioca - granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddings
amylum, starch - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles
2.cassava - cassava root eaten as a staple food after drying and leachingcassava - cassava root eaten as a staple food after drying and leaching; source of tapioca
tapioca - granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddings
bitter cassava, gari, mandioc, mandioca, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima, tapioca plant, manioc - cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
3.cassava - any of several plants of the genus Manihot having fleshy roots yielding a nutritious starch
genus Manihot, Manihot - genus of economically important tropical plants: cassava
bitter cassava, gari, mandioc, mandioca, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima, tapioca plant, manioc - cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
Manihot dulcis, sweet cassava - South American plant with roots used as a vegetable and herbage used for stock feed
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نَباتٌ اسْتِوائي يُنْتِجُ تابْيوكا
maniok
maniokplante
kasszava
manjokrunni
manijokas
manioks
maniok
manyok

cassava

[kəˈsɑːvə] Nmandioca f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cassava

[kəˈsɑːvə] n (= plant) → manioc m (= food) → manioc m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cassava

nManiok m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cassava

(kəˈsaːvə) noun
(also tapioca plant) a tropical plant, whose roots yield tapioca.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previous researchers reported that using rich and locally available feed resources with good nutritive composition, such as cassava hay, corn, forage sorghum and tropical legumes, as the alternative forage could reduce concentrate supplementation with improved feed utilization in ruminants [4,5,8,9].
The study was conducted to evaluate the excretion of urea, nitrogen balance and microbial protein synthesis in lactating goats fed with different sources of protein in concentrate (soybean meal, cottonseed meal, aerial part of cassava hay and leucaena hay).
Effect of elemental sulfur supplementation on rumen environment parameters and utilization efficiency of fresh cassava foliage and cassava hay in dairy cattle.
Effects of timing of initial cutting and subsequent cutting on yields and chemical compositions of cassava hay and its supplementation on lactating dairy cows.
The development and utilization of cassava hay (cassava whole crop at a young growth stage, 3-4 months, harvested about 30-45 cm above ground, and sun-dried for 1-2 days until having a final dry matter of at least 85%, Wanapat, 1999; 2003) as an on-farm feed has been recommended as a possible solution to the lack of good-quality roughages during the dry season in the tropics (Wanapat et al., 1997).
Among his outstanding research work, are those of urea-treatment of rice straw and the manipulation of cassava as cassava hay and on-farm food-feed-system development especially for the smallholder farmers.
(1998), who found no significant differences in dry matter intake of urea treated corn stover with or without supplementation of cassava hay. Krailas and Wanapat (2003) also concluded that supplementation of cassava hay, solely or in combination with Stylo hay, did not increase total DM and forage intake.
ABSTRACT : Twenty-four, lactating dairy cows were randomly assigned according to a Rrandomized complete block design (RCBD) to investigate the effect of sunflower oil supplementation (SFOS) with cassava hay based-diets on feed intake, digestibility of nutrients, rumen fermentation efficiency and milk production.
Experimental feeds were cottonseed meal (CSM); soybean meal (SBM); dried brewery's grains (DBG); palm kernel meal (PSM); cassava hay (CH); leucaena leaf meal (LLM).
The treatments were: T1) urea-treated (5%) rice straw (UTS); T2) cassava hay (CH); T3) fresh cassava foliage (FCF); T4) UTS:FCF (1:1 dry matter basis).