Cassiodorus


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Cas·si·o·dor·us

 (kăs′ē-ə-dôr′əs), Flavius Magnus Aurelius Sixth century ad.
Roman statesman and historian who wrote Chronicon, a universal history to ad 519, and Institutiones, a broad course of study for a monastery.

Cassiodorus

(ˌkæsɪəʊˈdɔːrəs)
n
(Biography) Flavius Magnus Aurelius (ˈfleɪvɪəs ˈmæɡnəs ɔːˈriːlɪəs). ?490–?585 ad, Roman statesman, writer, and monk; author of Variae, a collection of official documents written for the Ostrogoths
References in classic literature ?
Already, in the nineteenth year of our era, according to Cassiodorus and Pliny, a new island, Theia
I have not even been able to discover the secret of Cassiodorus, whose lamp burned without wick and without oil.
comes from Isidore and Cassiodorus. In his epicedium on Enrique de
In Fifth century works of Cassiodorus, followed by Arab physician Ishaq Bin Al-Rohawi in 6th century widened the dimensions of medical ethics.
(15) His main sources, however, were Greek and Latin chronicles--such as Cassiodorus's Gothic History, Marcellinus Comes' Chronicle, and Festus's Breviarium--and Jordanes often adapted these writers drastically.
The historian of the Church Cassiodorus renders the words of a hermit named Stephen who acknowledged the following:
Goscelin's reading list for Eve included the biblical commentaries of Jerome, Augustine, and Gregory, the lives of the church fathers, and the theological works of Cassiodorus, Augustine, Eusebius, Orosius, and Boethius, reflecting her presumed facility with literary Latin.
The most important of these are the didascalic treatises of Cassiodorus, Isidore, and Hugh of St.