caisson

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Related to Cassion: Caisson foundation, open caisson

cais·son

 (kā′sŏn′, -sən)
n.
1. A watertight structure within which construction work is carried on under water.
2. See camel.
3. A large box open at the top and one side, designed to fit against the side of a ship and used to repair damaged hulls under water. Also called cofferdam.
4. A floating structure used to close off the entrance to a dock or canal lock.
5.
a. A horse-drawn vehicle, usually two-wheeled, used to carry artillery ammunition and coffins at military funerals.
b. A large box used to hold ammunition.

[French, from Old French, large box, alteration (influenced by caisse, chest) of casson, from Italian cassone, augmentative of cassa, box, from Latin capsa.]

caisson

(kəˈsuːn; ˈkeɪsən)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a watertight chamber open at the bottom and containing air under pressure, used to carry out construction work under water
2. (Civil Engineering) a similar unpressurized chamber
3. (General Engineering) a watertight float filled with air, used to raise sunken ships. See also camel2
4. (General Engineering) a watertight structure placed across the entrance of a basin, dry dock, etc, to exclude water from it
5. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery)
a. a box containing explosives, formerly used as a mine
b. an ammunition chest
c. a two-wheeled vehicle containing an ammunition chest
6. (Architecture) another name for coffer3
[C18: from French, assimilated to caisse case2]

cais•son

(ˈkeɪ sɒn, -sən)

n.
1. any of various structures used as a protective environment for workers, esp. one consisting of a pressurized, watertight chamber for use in underwater construction.
2.
a. a float for raising a sunken vessel.
b. a watertight structure built against a damaged hull to render it watertight.
3. a two-wheeled wagon, used for carrying artillery ammunition.
4. an ammunition chest.
[1695–1705; < French, Middle French < Old Provençal, derivative of caissa box (see case2)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caisson - an ornamental sunken panel in a ceiling or domecaisson - an ornamental sunken panel in a ceiling or dome
panel - sheet that forms a distinct (usually flat and rectangular) section or component of something
2.caisson - a two-wheeled military vehicle carrying artillery ammunition
military vehicle - vehicle used by the armed forces
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
3.caisson - a chest to hold ammunitioncaisson - a chest to hold ammunition    
chest - box with a lid; used for storage; usually large and sturdy
4.caisson - large watertight chamber used for construction under watercaisson - large watertight chamber used for construction under water
chamber - a natural or artificial enclosed space
Translations
kasuunisulkuportti

caisson

[ˈkeɪsən] N (Mech) → cajón m hidráulico (Naut) → cajón m de suspensión; [of dry-dock] → puerta f de dique (Mil) → cajón m de municiones

caisson

n
(Mil) → Munitionskiste f; (= wagon)Munitionswagen m
(Tech: = underwater caisson) → Senkkasten m, → Caisson m
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2005) gave different rheological properties in various conditions to describe ice slurry rheology, namely, the Bingham, Power Law, Herschel-Bulkley, and Cassion model, respectively (Chhabra and Richardson 2008).