Dio Cassius

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Dio Cassius

(ˈdaɪəʊ ˈkæsɪəs)
n
(Biography) ?155–?230 ad, Roman historian. His History of Rome covers the period of Rome's transition from Republic to Empire
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cassius Dio paints the picture so elegantly in his 'Roman History': 'Because of the insatiable lust for power' by these former allies, 'Rome was being compelled to fight both in her own defense and against herself, so that even if victorious, she would be vanquished.' And at the battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC, Caesar saw the end of Pompey, his former ally.
How we manage to move from Ovid to Cassius Dio in the span of one sentence--as if all of these authors were next door to each other in the same moment of intellectual rapture--defies comprehension.
Cassius Dio's Forgotten History of Early Rome: The Roman History, Books 1-21
When Boudica led her rebellion against the Roman occupation of her land in c.AD60, the historian Cassius Dio remembered it thus: "All this ruin was brought upon the Romans by a woman, the fact which in itself caused them the greatest shame."
As writer Cassius Dio recorded at the time: "They dwell in tents, naked and unshod, possess their women in common."
We know so much about them because they were witnessed, recorded, and vilified by the senator and historian, Cassius Dio. Toner's little book tries to put Commodus's gladiatorial interests into context.
Though Caesar's Blood reads as fluidly as a novel, it is a work of pure nonfiction, drawing upon the writings of ancient historians including Sallust, Tacitus, Cassius Dio, Suetonius, and more.
Williams tells the saga of the Caesar family and the triumphs and disasters of its members through the work of ancient historians Sallust, Tacitus, Cassius Dio, Suetonius, and others.
Cassius Dio. Historiae Romanae (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press).