Castanea dentata


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Related to Castanea dentata: Castanea mollissima, chestnut tree
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Noun1.Castanea dentata - large tree found from Maine to AlabamaCastanea dentata - large tree found from Maine to Alabama
Castanea, genus Castanea - chestnuts; chinkapins
chestnut tree, chestnut - any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
References in periodicals archive ?
Chestnuts (Castanea dentata) were once the dominant hardwood tree species in eastern North America.
Nelson, "A conceptual framework for restoration of threatened plants: The effective model of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) reintroduction," New Phytologist, vol.
These correspond to when the Cryphonectria parasitica fungus moved through Pennsylvania and eliminated Castanea dentata (American chestnut) from the forest (DeCoster, 1995).
That tree was the American chestnut, Castanea dentata. Scientists now have reason to hope that the majestic trees, once widespread throughout North America but virtually eliminated by the Asiatic blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, formerly known as Endothia parasitica, might return blight resistant.
The American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was once one of the fastest growing hardwoods, reaching heights of over 80 feet and diameters up to 5 feet--there are even reports from western North Carolina of stumps measuring 12 feet across.
Recent efforts to develop a blight-resistant hybrid form of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) have literally yielded fruit.
Cryphonectria parasitica is an introduced fungal pathogen responsible for the decline of the American chestnut, Castanea dentata. Pathogen populations often have several vegetative compatibility (vc) groups that are governed by alternate alleles at six or more vic loci.
ozarkensis), a close relative of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) that has unfortunately shared the classic American tree's devastating fate.
The most common edible chestnut species are the American chestnut (Castanea dentata), Chinese chestnut (C.
That tree was the American chestnut, Castanea dentata. Scientists now have reason to hope that the majestic trees, once widespread throughout North America but virtually eliminated by the Asiatic blight fungus Eryphonectria parasitica, formerly known as Endothia parasitica, might return blight resistant.