Catal Huyuk

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Related to Catalhoyuk: Jericho

Ca·tal Hu·yuk

or ça·tal·hö·yük  (chä-täl′hœ-yük′)
An archaeological site in south-central Turkey southeast of Konya. It contains well-preserved ruins of a large Neolithic settlement.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turkey is home to more than 10 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the Neolithic site of Catalhoyuk
| For more information visit clubmed.co.uk Turkey is home to more than 10 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the Neolithic site of Catalhoyuk
While the mother-goddess of Catalhoyuk, an ancient settlement in Anatolia, was depicted in 5600BC astride two leopards, the modern take began 73 years ago and the PS20billion swimwear industry is now largely driven by bikinis.
The researchers examined 742 human skeletons unearthed at the prehistoricruins of Catalhoyuk, inhabited from 9,100 to 7,950 years ago during a pivotal time in human evolution, for clues about what life was like at one of the earliest sizable settlements in the archeological record.
Caption: A very early map; rendering by John Swogger, project artist, Remixing Catalhoyuk Project; flickr.com/photos/ 13496475@N06/1448788273
2017 Skull retrieval and secondary burial practices in the Neolithic Near East: Recent insights from Catalhoyuk, Turkey.
What do the headless figures found in the famous paintings at Catalhoyuk in Turkey have in common with the interlinked spirals carved on the monumental tombs at Newgrange and Knowth in Ireland?
Domesticating clay: the role of clay balls, mini balls and geometric objects in daily life at Catalhoyuk. Changing Materialities at Catalhoyuk: Reports from the 1995-99 Seasons, editado por I.
The rich symbolism of wild creatures, which had probably long been linked with the supernatural world, now incorporated domesticated animals; these are represented in fragile wall paintings and moulded reliefs at villages such as Catalhoyuk.